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i have a very simple perl question regarding pattern matching problem. I am reading file with a list of names (fileA). I would like to check if any of these names exist in another file (fileB).

if ($name -e $fileB){
    do something
}else{
    do something else
}

it is in a way to check if a pattern exists in a file. I have tried

open(IN, $controls) or die "Can't open the control file\n";
    while(my $line = <IN>){
            if ($name =~ $line ){
                    print "$name\tfound\n";
            }else{
                    print "$name\tnotFound\n";
            }
    }

This is repeating itself as it checks and prints every entry rather than checking whether the name exists or not.

share|improve this question
    
-e is a file test, it checks if a certain file exists. It does not have anything to do with the file's content. – TLP Jun 13 '13 at 13:44
    
calling it pattern matching is kinda misleading here, you're matching exact strings are you not? Pattern implies there's some wildcards or regex at play. – doubleDown Jun 13 '13 at 14:23

To check whether a pattern exists in a file, you have to open the file and read its content. The fastest way how to search for inclusion of two lists is to store the content in a hash:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

open my $LST, '<', 'fileA' or die "fileA: $!\n";
open my $FB,  '<', 'fileB' or die "fileB: $!\n";

my %hash;
while (<$FB>) {
    chomp;
    undef $hash{$_};
}

while (<$LST>) {
    chomp;
    if (exists $hash{$_}) {
        print "$_ exists in fileB.\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

When you are doing compare one list to another, you're interested in hashes. A hash is an array that is keyed and the list itself has no order. A hash can only have a single instance of a particular key (but different keys can have the same data).

What you can do is go through the first file, and create a hash keyed by that line. Then, you go through the second folder and check to see if any of those lines match any keys in your hash:

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);
use autodie;  #You don't have to check if "open" fails.

use constant {
    FIRST_FILE   => 'file1.txt',
    SECOND_FILE  => 'file2.txt',
};
open my $first_fh, "<", FIRST_FILE;

# Get each line as a hash key
my %line_hash;
while ( my $line = <$first_fh> ) {
    chomp $line;
    $line_hash{$line} = 1;
}
close $first_fh;

Now each line is a key in your hash %line_hash. The data really doesn't matter. The important part is the value of the key itself.

Now that I have my hash of the lines in the first file, I can read in the second file and see if that line exists in my hash:

open my $second_fh, "<", SECOND_FILE;
while ( my $line = <$second_fh> ) {
    chomp $line;
    if ( exists $line_hash{$line} ) {
        say qq(I found "$line" in both files);
    }
}
close $second_fh;

There's a map function too that can be used:

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);
use autodie;  #You don't have to check if "open" fails.

use constant {
    FIRST_FILE   => 'file1.txt',
    SECOND_FILE  => 'file2.txt',
};
open my $first_fh, "<", FIRST_FILE
chomp ( my @lines = <$first_fh> );

# Get each line as a hash key
my %line_hash = map { $_ => 1 } @lines;
close $first_fh;

open my $second_fh, "<", SECOND_FILE;
while ( my $line = <$second_fh> ) {
    chomp $line;
    if ( exists $line_hash{$line} ) {
        say qq(I found "$line" in both files);
    }
}
close $second_fh;

I am not a great fan of map because I don't find it that much more efficient and it is harder to understand what is going on.

share|improve this answer

I have just given an algorithm kind of code which is not tested. But i feel this does the job for you.

my @a;
my $matched
my $line;
open(A,"fileA");
open(A,"fileB");
while(<A>)
{
    chomp;
    push @a,$_;
}
while(<B>)
{
    chomp;
    $line=$_;
    $matched=0;
    for(@a){if($line=~/$_/){last;$matched=1}}
    if($matched)
    {
        do something
    }
    else
    {
        do something else
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You're doing a double loop which is going to take O<sup>2</sup> as long. – David W. Jun 13 '13 at 14:07

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