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I've ran into a problem of having to run a number of different queries on the DB (different return types, different number of columns, etc). While writing that i started to wonder if there's a proper way of writing a helper function. It seemed that it's really easy to write a function that returns a ResultSet.

However since it a) doesn't close connection b) doesn't close the result set it seems as a possibly working, but improper solution. Is there any place to dump in all results so that they can be returned safely.

(Only thing i could come up with, is just returning a 2D string array (after converting all data to strings) and then converting it all back)

EDIT : Sorry for not writing clear, was wondering if there's any way to just store the result of the query as is (don't need to modify it) without writing a separate method for every possible return type.

The idea behind a 2d string list is being able to store the query values as is.

Col1 Row1 | Col2 Row1 | Col3 Row1
Col1 Row2 | Col2 Row2 | Col3 Row2

EDIT 2 Thank you for replies, i guess i'll just write a small parser for it.

share|improve this question
    
It's unclear what your question is. The ResultSet itself is rarely the goal -- usually you want to create some object based off of the data in the results. Are you trying to automatically rehydrate objects from the database? If so, look into Hibernate and JPA. –  Tom G Jun 13 '13 at 14:17
    
Draft your question clearly and explain what you want. A good question shouldn't be ambiguous. –  vineet Jun 13 '13 at 14:19
1  
This question is way too diffuse. I have no way of understanding what the problem(s) is/are. You'll want to be more specific and provide us examples. The only viable way to do JDBC is with an organized approach ... classes for your data model objects are essential. If you're trying to freeball everything, you'll find that your code very rapidly becomes ugly and impossible to maintain. Consult this reference for some info: stackoverflow.com/questions/16571358/… –  scottb Jun 13 '13 at 14:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd recommend looking at Spring JDBC. Don't write such a thing yourself. It's already been done, and quite well.

For example, I don't like your idea of returning a List of Strings. You lose a lot of info that way. I'd return a Map of Lists (column view) or List of Maps (row view).

If you must, here are some database utilities that would get you started.

package persistence;

import java.sql.*;
import java.util.*;

/**
 * util.DatabaseUtils
 * User: Michael
 * Date: Aug 17, 2010
 * Time: 7:58:02 PM
 */
public class DatabaseUtils {
/*
    private static final String DEFAULT_DRIVER = "oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver";
    private static final String DEFAULT_URL = "jdbc:oracle:thin:@host:1521:database";
    private static final String DEFAULT_USERNAME = "username";
    private static final String DEFAULT_PASSWORD = "password";
*/
/*
    private static final String DEFAULT_DRIVER = "org.postgresql.Driver";
    private static final String DEFAULT_URL = "jdbc:postgresql://localhost:5432/party";
    private static final String DEFAULT_USERNAME = "pgsuper";
    private static final String DEFAULT_PASSWORD = "pgsuper";
*/
    private static final String DEFAULT_DRIVER = "com.mysql.jdbc.Driver";
    private static final String DEFAULT_URL = "jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/party";
    private static final String DEFAULT_USERNAME = "party";
    private static final String DEFAULT_PASSWORD = "party";

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        long begTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

        String driver = ((args.length > 0) ? args[0] : DEFAULT_DRIVER);
        String url = ((args.length > 1) ? args[1] : DEFAULT_URL);
        String username = ((args.length > 2) ? args[2] : DEFAULT_USERNAME);
        String password = ((args.length > 3) ? args[3] : DEFAULT_PASSWORD);

        Connection connection = null;

        try {
            connection = createConnection(driver, url, username, password);
            DatabaseMetaData meta = connection.getMetaData();
            System.out.println(meta.getDatabaseProductName());
            System.out.println(meta.getDatabaseProductVersion());

            String sqlQuery = "SELECT PERSON_ID, FIRST_NAME, LAST_NAME FROM PERSON ORDER BY LAST_NAME";
            System.out.println("before insert: " + query(connection, sqlQuery, Collections.EMPTY_LIST));

            connection.setAutoCommit(false);
            String sqlUpdate = "INSERT INTO PERSON(FIRST_NAME, LAST_NAME) VALUES(?,?)";
            List parameters = Arrays.asList("Foo", "Bar");
            int numRowsUpdated = update(connection, sqlUpdate, parameters);
            connection.commit();

            System.out.println("# rows inserted: " + numRowsUpdated);
            System.out.println("after insert: " + query(connection, sqlQuery, Collections.EMPTY_LIST));
        } catch (Exception e) {
            rollback(connection);
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            close(connection);
            long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
            System.out.println("wall time: " + (endTime - begTime) + " ms");
        }
    }

    public static Connection createConnection(String driver, String url, String username, String password) throws ClassNotFoundException, SQLException {
        Class.forName(driver);
        if ((username == null) || (password == null) || (username.trim().length() == 0) || (password.trim().length() == 0)) {
            return DriverManager.getConnection(url);
        } else {
            return DriverManager.getConnection(url, username, password);
        }
    }

    public static void close(Connection connection) {
        try {
            if (connection != null) {
                connection.close();
            }
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }


    public static void close(Statement st) {
        try {
            if (st != null) {
                st.close();
            }
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public static void close(ResultSet rs) {
        try {
            if (rs != null) {
                rs.close();
            }
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public static void rollback(Connection connection) {
        try {
            if (connection != null) {
                connection.rollback();
            }
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public static List<Map<String, Object>> map(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
        List<Map<String, Object>> results = new ArrayList<Map<String, Object>>();
        try {
            if (rs != null) {
                ResultSetMetaData meta = rs.getMetaData();
                int numColumns = meta.getColumnCount();
                while (rs.next()) {
                    Map<String, Object> row = new HashMap<String, Object>();
                    for (int i = 1; i <= numColumns; ++i) {
                        String name = meta.getColumnName(i);
                        Object value = rs.getObject(i);
                        row.put(name, value);
                    }
                    results.add(row);
                }
            }
        } finally {
            close(rs);
        }
        return results;
    }

    public static List<Map<String, Object>> query(Connection connection, String sql, List<Object> parameters) throws SQLException {
        List<Map<String, Object>> results = null;
        PreparedStatement ps = null;
        ResultSet rs = null;
        try {
            ps = connection.prepareStatement(sql);

            int i = 0;
            for (Object parameter : parameters) {
                ps.setObject(++i, parameter);
            }
            rs = ps.executeQuery();
            results = map(rs);
        } finally {
            close(rs);
            close(ps);
        }
        return results;
    }

    public static int update(Connection connection, String sql, List<Object> parameters) throws SQLException {
        int numRowsUpdated = 0;
        PreparedStatement ps = null;
        try {
            ps = connection.prepareStatement(sql);

            int i = 0;
            for (Object parameter : parameters) {
                ps.setObject(++i, parameter);
            }
            numRowsUpdated = ps.executeUpdate();
        } finally {
            close(ps);
        }
        return numRowsUpdated;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You shouldn't be returning resultSets, you should read the results from the resultset into some kind of container object. A ResultSet is a wrapper around a database cursor, it goes away when the connection closes. It's something you read from and close right away, not something you can pass around your application.

Look at how spring-jdbc does it. You implement a resultSetMapper that is passed to the method on the JdbcTemplate.

Several observations:

  • You don't need to use Spring to use spring-jdbc. However, I see very little value in reimplementing this stuff yourself.

  • It's not the job of the code that reads the ResultSet to open and close connections, that needs to be elsewhere.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - agree regarding Spring. –  duffymo Jun 13 '13 at 14:20
1  
For some of us, it's too late ... I've already unwittingly reinvented spring. –  scottb Jun 13 '13 at 14:30
    
Ignore your sunk costs and ditch it now. Big mistake. You should at least isolate your mess behind interfaces so you can change the implementation without affecting clients. –  duffymo Jun 13 '13 at 14:41

You can write helper functions that parse a ResultSet and convert it into an ArrayList or an array or even the fields of an object. For instance, lets say you have a table of orders and then a query returns all of the rows of that table for a particular user (customer). We could then do something like this:

static List<Order> parseOrder(ResultSet rs) {
   ArrayList<Order> orderList = new ArrayList<>();
   while(rs.next() ) {
      Order order = new Order();
      order.setID(rs.getInt(1));
      order.setCustomerID(rs.getInt(2));
      order.setItemName(rs.getString(3));
      orderList.add(order);
  }
  return orderList;

}

Simply turning the result set into an array of an array of Objects would be more general, but probably less useful.

I would leave it up to the calling function to close this ResultSet and possible the PreparedStatement (or Statement) and database connection.

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