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In a recent course at school about networking / operating systems I learned about thread pools. Now he basic functionality is pretty straight forward and I understand this. However, what's not specified in my book is what happens when the thread pool is exhausted? For example you have a pool with 20 threads in it and you have 20 connected clients. Another client tries to connect but there's no threads left in the pool, what happens then? Does the client go in a queue? Does the system make another thread to put in the pool? Something else?

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The answer depends highly on your language, your operation system, and your pool implementation.

what happens when the thread pool is exhausted? Another client tries to connect but there's no threads left in the pool, what happens then? Does the client go in a queue?

Typically in a server situation, it depends on the socket settings. Either the socket connection gets queued by the OS or the connection gets refused. This is usually not handled by the thread-pool. In ~unix operation systems, this queue or "backlog" is handled by the listen method.

Does the system make another thread to put in the pool?

This depends on the thread-pool. Some pools are fixed size so no more threads will be added. Other thread-pools are "cached" thread pools so it will reuse a free thread or will create a new one if none are available. Many web servers have max thread settings so you don't thrash the system by handling too many concurrent connections.

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That makes sense, thanks :) –  user757926 Jun 13 '13 at 14:29
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It depends on the policy used by the thread-pool:

  • the pool size can be static, and when a new thread is requested the caller will wait on a synchronization primitives like a semaphore, or the request can be pushed into a queue

  • the pool size can be unlimited but this may be dangerous because creating too much threads can greatly reduce the performance; more often than note it is ranged between a min and a max set by the pool user

  • the pool can use a dynamic policy depending on the context: hardware resources like CPU or RAM, OS resources like synchronization primitives and threads, current process resources (memory, threads, handles...)

An example of a smart thread-pool: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/7933/Smart-Thread-Pool

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It depends on the thread pool implementation. They might be put on a queue, they might get a new thread created for them, or they might even just get an error message saying come back later. Or if you are the one implementing the thread pool, you can do whatever you want.

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A crucial thing to understand here is that not every thread should be run in a thread-pool.

In particular, it is usually not advisable to allow pooled threads to block in any way. For example, consider a number of consumer threads blocking on retrieving items from a queue. As soon as the number of consumer threads reaches the capacity of the pool, you deadlock. There is no more room for a producer thread to execute, so the queue will stay empty forever and you never make any progress.

Therefore pooled threads are usually designed in a way that they always make progress. If you run into a situation where you would have to block, you instead give up execution and ask the thread-pool to run another thread. This is similar to cooperative multi-threading.

Naturally this requires some additional effort from the programmer, but when done correctly can lead to very nice and clean designs. On the other hand, thread-pools are in no way a good choice for any use case. Depending on the particular target application, it might not be possible to switch to pooled threads at all.

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