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I'm in a situation where I have to use jQuery 1.6. The web sites jQuery file type is out of my control. I have the following HTML element with attributes on it...

<div id="myitem" style="display: none; position: absolute;" role="status" aria-hidden="true">
...
</div>

Every time I select an option from a dropdown menu, the display property for the code above will switch to display:block for any time between 5 - 10 seconds. It varies. Then switch back to display:none.

I want to be able to use live() to detect when that display property goes back to display:none. Is that possible with jQuery? I need do this from scratch because I do not have access to the original js function that controls HTML element.

Is this possible? (i.e. simply doing a console.log('the display is now hidden again'))

Thanks for any advice

share|improve this question
    
.live() has been depreciated for a long time and remove altogether from jQuery 1.9. –  Matt Burland Jun 13 '13 at 14:28
3  
I know that. But I am using jQuery 1.6 for the site I am working on. on() does not work in jQuery 1.6. I have to resort to finding out how to track when elements change their attributes in the future, for jquery 1.6 –  blackhawk Jun 13 '13 at 14:29
2  
Perhaps you want (deprecated) DOM3 Mutation Events, or DOM4 MutationObservers? –  apsillers Jun 13 '13 at 14:31
2  
@blachawk: Regardless, the docs recommend you use .delegate() even in older versions of jQuery. –  Matt Burland Jun 13 '13 at 14:31
1  
@blachawk: Personally, I'd use setInterval with a delay of maybe 1 second (1000 ms, but adjust it until you get performance that you feel is acceptable). Just make sure you clearInterval once the element has disappeared again. –  Matt Burland Jun 13 '13 at 15:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sounds like you want to "watch" the value of style.display on that div. That's not impossible, but unpractical and unstable. The easiest solution is to add a new change event handler on the dropdown itself. For that, you can use .live (for that jQuery version), .delegate, or .change (as long as you do it when the DOM is loaded). And make sure to register that event after the original event handler for the dropdown is added.

To deal with the timeout, set a timer from your handler, and make sure it's longer than the maximum time from the other timer.

For example:

$(function(){
    $('#dropdown').change(function() {
        setTimeout(function() {
            console.log('checking display property');
            if($('#myitem').css('display') == 'none') {
                console.log('the display is now hidden again');
            }
        }, 11000);
    });
});

Proof of concept: http://jsfiddle.net/wLEPh/1/

The caveat here is if you change the display again between the moment the original timer and your new timer run. In this case, your code will not detect that the div has been hidden for a moment. The alternative is to use MutationOberver to monitor the property change directly, but it has support and performance issues.

share|improve this answer
1  
It sounds like the item is displayed and then hidden again via some kind of timeout, so it looks like just reacting to the drop down won't cut it. –  Matt Burland Jun 13 '13 at 14:34
    
Hm, in this case we'd have to use a timeout here too. –  bfavaretto Jun 13 '13 at 14:35
    
@bfavaretto I totally agree with you and appriciate that insight! But that does not work based on my testing yesterday...the HTML code initially is set to display:none. When you click the dropdown item, it then sets to display:block for 5 to 10 seconds (it vaires). The change method only looks for the display property at that given moment, not 5 to 10 seconds later. Does that make sense? I just feel stuck because your answer is the most logical step I have discovered so far, I just need to jquery to wait until display block goes back to display none, no matter how long it takes... –  blackhawk Jun 13 '13 at 14:38
    
I'll update my answer. You have to check after a timeout too, and make sure it's longer than the original timeout. –  bfavaretto Jun 13 '13 at 14:39
1  
@blachawk I suppose support for MutationObserver should be better in the future (if they don't deprecate it again!) –  bfavaretto Jun 13 '13 at 14:56

A slight alteration to bfavaretto's answer using setInterval instead of a single timeout:

$(function(){
    $('#dropdown').change(function() {
        var timerID = setInterval(function() {
            console.log('checking display property');
            if($('#myitem').css('display') == 'none') {
                console.log('the display is now hidden again');
                clearInterval(timerID);
            }
        }, 1000);
    });
});

You might also put in a check so that if after some maximum amount of time your element still hasn't disappeared again, you do something else.

The advantage is if it takes 5 seconds for the element to disappear again, you'll only wait a maximum of ~6 seconds.* But it it takes 10 seconds, it'll still wait 10, or at most ~11 seconds. If something changes with your third-party library and it suddenly takes only 1 second, you won't be stuck waiting any more than ~2 seconds. Or if it's suddenly much slower, it should still handle it.

*note: obviously none of these timings are supposed to be exact.

share|improve this answer
    
This works very nice too. thank you! –  blackhawk Jun 13 '13 at 19:15
    
@bfavaretto: Apologies for mangling your username too! –  Matt Burland Jun 13 '13 at 19:18
    
:-) no problem! –  bfavaretto Jun 13 '13 at 19:19

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