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In JavaScript, if I have:

var foo = function(){}

foo.prototype.bar = function() {
    console.log(this);
}

baz = new foo();
baz.name = 'baz';

bing = new foo();
bing.name = 'bing';

baz.bar();
bing.bar();

setTimeout(baz.bar);
setTimeout(bing.bar);

In my console I see the baz, bing, window, window objects logged, in that order.

What would be the simplest, or "normal" trickery required to see:

baz, bing, baz, bing logged using a "this-like" variable inside the bar function on the prototype of foo?

When I say "this-like", I mean, a variable that I could use within bar() to access the object that it is a method of both now and later.

Edit:

Further clarification, I'd like to avoid needing to know when I call bar() that it will want to use this and that I would therefore need to do something like bind(). Assume that when I'm calling bar() on baz or bing, that it's a "black box". I want to call bar() as a method of bing or baz without knowing how it works, and I want the internals of bar() to know what object it is a method of.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One strategy, if you prefer not to use bind(), is to attach your "bound" methods to the object at construction time, referring "indirectly" to this.

This:

var foo = function(){
  var _this = this;
  this.bar = function() {
    console.log(_this);
  }
}


baz = new foo();
baz.name = 'baz';

bing = new foo();
bing.name = 'bing';

baz.bar();
bing.bar();

setTimeout(baz.bar);
setTimeout(bing.bar);

Logs:

baz
bing
baz
bing

But in general, I like to use this when possible so I can apply() my methods to other objects if so-desired. And I just encapsulate my "deferred calls" in anonymous functions under the assumption that they use this:

setTimeout(function() { baz.bar(); });
setTimeout(function() { bing.bar(); });
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this looks closer to what I'm after... I'm going to have a quick fiddle with this... –  David Meister Jun 13 '13 at 15:04
    
This is cool but then var foo = function(){ var _this = this; this.bar = function() { console.log(_this); } } foo.prototype.buzz = function() { console.log(_this); } breaks for buzz(), which isn't the end of the world but... –  David Meister Jun 13 '13 at 15:09
    
@DavidMeister Yeah. You can't directly see variables used locally in the constructor from prototype methods. A possible workaround is to use a getBoundThis() convention. var _this = this; this.getBoundThis = function() { return _this; } –  svidgen Jun 13 '13 at 15:15
    
Scratch my workaround. That doesn't make sense! –  svidgen Jun 13 '13 at 15:23
    
That's fine. I think this is more what I was after than using bind(). Using the constructor to kind of get a "snapshot" of the object the methods are being added to is about as close as I'm going to get. –  David Meister Jun 13 '13 at 15:29

Use bind (though you might need to shim it for older browsers):

setTimeout(baz.bar.bind(baz));
setTimeout(bing.bar.bind(bing));
// btw,
//         baz.bar.bind(bing)
//         foo.prototype.bar.bind(bing)
// would have the same result
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is that not executing immediately, rather than when the timeout fires? –  David Meister Jun 13 '13 at 14:50
    
@DavidMeister Look at some docs: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… . bind returns a new function...it's not invoked anywhere –  Ian Jun 13 '13 at 14:50
    
No, bind returns the bound function that is then scheduled by setTimeout –  Bergi Jun 13 '13 at 14:51
    
ah sure. makes sense. –  David Meister Jun 13 '13 at 14:51
    
is there a way to do this though that doesn't require prior knowledge that bar() will try to use this? –  David Meister Jun 13 '13 at 14:52

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