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I am doing some testing with Unix domain sockets and I can communicate over them without an issue, however, when I call accept() on the server side of my test program, the returned struct sockaddr_un doesn't contain a sun_path.

I am pretty sure that Inet sockets have their address and port properly filled out after an accept() call, so am I doing something wrong in my test program or am I expecting the wrong outcome?

I am running CentOS 6.2 and gcc 4.4.6.

Sample Code:

server.c

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sys/un.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define NAME "socket"

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int sock, msgsock, rval;
    struct sockaddr_un server, client;
    char buf[1024];

    sock = socket(AF_UNIX, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    if (sock < 0) {
        perror("opening stream socket");
        exit(1);
    }

    server.sun_family = AF_UNIX;
    strcpy(server.sun_path, NAME);

    if (bind(sock, (struct sockaddr *) &server, sizeof(struct sockaddr_un))) {
        perror("binding stream socket");
        exit(1);
    }

    printf("Socket has name %s\n", server.sun_path);
    listen(sock, 5);

    for (;;) {
        socklen_t len = sizeof(client);
        msgsock = accept(sock, (struct sockaddr *)&client, &len);

        if (msgsock == -1)
            perror("accept");
        else do {
            printf("strlen(sun_path) = %zu\n", strlen(client.sun_path));

            bzero(buf, sizeof(buf));
            if ((rval = read(msgsock, buf, 1024)) < 0)
                perror("reading stream message");
            else if (rval == 0)
                printf("Ending connection\n");
            else
                printf("-->%s\n", buf);
        } while (rval > 0);

        close(msgsock);
    }
    close(sock);
    unlink(NAME);

    return 0;
}

client.c

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sys/un.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define DATA "Half a league, half a league . . ."

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int sock;
    struct sockaddr_un server;

    if (argc < 2) {
        printf("usage:%s <pathname>", argv[0]);
        exit(1);
    }

    sock = socket(AF_UNIX, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    if (sock < 0) {
        perror("opening stream socket");
        exit(1);
    }

    server.sun_family = AF_UNIX;
    strcpy(server.sun_path, argv[1]);

    if (connect(sock, (struct sockaddr *) &server,
                sizeof(struct sockaddr_un)) < 0) {
        close(sock);
        perror("connecting stream socket");
        exit(1);
    }

    if (write(sock, DATA, sizeof(DATA)) < 0)
        perror("writing on stream socket");

    close(sock);

    return 0;
}

Just to reiterate the question:

Why isn't sun_path filled out after the accept() call on the server?

share|improve this question
    
Truly a miracle… len becomes 2 which is sizeof(sa_family_t) and according to the man this can happen only when the socket is unbound, but in your case it is clearly bound… – kirelagin Jun 13 '13 at 15:20
    
I also tried with abstract sockets and, again, this length is always 2 which is clearly wrong, accoring to the man page. – kirelagin Jun 13 '13 at 15:38
    
I think this might be normal. Like sockets returned by socketpair(), these types of sockets aren't bound to any path, but they are nevertheless connected to another socket at the other end. – Celada Jun 13 '13 at 15:45
    
@kirelagin thanks for the comments and effort! – Kevin S Jun 14 '13 at 16:25
1  
@Celada I wouldn't be surprised if you are correct, I was hoping that someone could definitively tell me yes or no though. Thanks! – Kevin S Jun 14 '13 at 16:28

I am really not sure if this is an answer at all. Probably it's more like musings about some research, though maybe still worth while reading.

The value filled by accept(2) seems to be quite protocol agnostic at least in Linux 3.16.0, NetBSD 6.1.4 and Darwin 13.1.0 kernels. In practice this means that the second parameter to accept(2), struct sockaddr * gets filled only up to what is shared between all protocols. So what you have in your hands after a successful acccept(2) is far from being a complete struct sockaddr_un.

Probably nobody thought it would be of much importance at the time first implementations of accept(2) were done and now we're stuck with this. Fortunately there is a way around that, in case one has lost the pathname used for socket with call to bind(2), and would now like to find it again.

With struct sockaddr_storage and getsockname(2) the member sun_path is accessible. So, to make sure you are getting all juicy details, call getsockname(2) after a successful call to accept(2) (this would be put after line number 40 in your server.c):

       struct sockaddr_storage ss;
       socklen_t sslen = sizeof(struct sockaddr_storage);
       if (getsockname(msgsock, (struct sockaddr *)&ss, &sslen) == 0) {
               struct sockaddr_un *un = (struct sockaddr_un *)&ss;
               printf("socket name is: %s\n", un->sun_path);
       }

Or just use this:

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sys/un.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define NAME "socket"

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int sock, msgsock, rval;
    struct sockaddr_un server, client;
    char buf[1024];

    sock = socket(AF_UNIX, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    if (sock < 0) {
        perror("opening stream socket");
        exit(1);
    }

    server.sun_family = AF_UNIX;
    strcpy(server.sun_path, NAME);

    if (bind(sock, (struct sockaddr *) &server, sizeof(struct sockaddr_un))) {
        perror("binding stream socket");
        exit(1);
    }

    printf("Socket has name %s\n", server.sun_path);
    listen(sock, 5);

    for (;;) {
        socklen_t len = sizeof(client);
        msgsock = accept(sock, (struct sockaddr *)&client, &len);

        if (msgsock == -1)
            perror("accept");
        else do {
            printf("strlen(sun_path) = %zu\n", strlen(client.sun_path));

            struct sockaddr_storage ss;
            socklen_t sslen = sizeof(struct sockaddr_storage);
            if (getsockname(msgsock, (struct sockaddr *)&ss, &sslen) == 0) {
                    struct sockaddr_un *un = (struct sockaddr_un *)&ss;
                    printf("socket name is: %s\n", un->sun_path);
            }

            bzero(buf, sizeof(buf));
            if ((rval = read(msgsock, buf, 1024)) < 0)
                perror("reading stream message");
            else if (rval == 0)
                printf("Ending connection\n");
            else
                printf("-->%s\n", buf);
        } while (rval > 0);

        close(msgsock);
    }
    close(sock);
    unlink(NAME);

    return 0;
}

This has been tested, ie. it compiles and produces expected results, to work on a GNU/Linux system running kernel 3.16.0, a NetBSD system running 6.1.4 kernel, and a system equipped with OS/X Mavericks, running 13.1.0 kernel. In all of these behaviour of accept(2) is consistent: sun_path is nowhere to be found in the structure filled. The behaviour of getsockname(2) is consistent between different operating environments too, making all protocol specific details available.

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