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I have the following HTML code, where I would like to format with css a data format (coming from xml) which can't be changed.

I have to give different styles to elements with different attribute value. I thought to use the CSS attribute selector.

body {
    background-color: black
}
s {
    text-decoration: none
}
f {
    color: black;
    text-decoration: none;
    display: block;
}
f[type=h2] {
    color: green
}
f[type=p] {
    color: blue
}
f[type=speech] {
    color: yellow
}
f[type=other] {
    color: gray
}
<b>
  <s> 
    <f type="h2">Title</f>
    <f type="p">Paragraph</f>
    <f type="speech">Dialgoue</f>
    <f type="other" br="true">Other</f>
    <f type="p">Paragraph</f>
    <f type="p">Paragraph</f>
  </s>
</b>

In Firefox the page is rendered as I expect (h2 in green, p in blue, speech in yelllow and other in gray). In chrome everything is green.

How can I obtain the Firefox result in Chrome?

share|improve this question
    
Are you using a doctype? – Marc Audet Jun 13 '13 at 15:10
2  
Few realize that you can style XML using CSS or alternatively, XSLT. – Jaime Gris Jun 13 '13 at 15:10
1  
@Zenith The OP is trying to style an XML document instead of regular HTML... – Marc Audet Jun 13 '13 at 15:10
1  
@MarcAudet Oops, that shows me for going straight to the code! – lifetimes Jun 13 '13 at 15:11
1  
w3.org/Style/styling-XML.en.html – Adrift Jun 13 '13 at 15:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

For some unknown reason, Chrome is rather strict on HTML tags thus the CSS rule won't work well in the said browser.

A suggestion though, why don't you style the XML instead?

share|improve this answer
    
Others suggested this solution. This is the simplest and clearest one. Thanks. – riccardo.tasso Jun 14 '13 at 6:59

Changing attr name will help you , andi have no idea why

        <f custom="p">Paragraph</f>
        <f custom="speech">Dialgoue</f>
        <f custom="other" br="true">Other</f>
        <f custom="p">Paragraph</f>
        <f custom="p">Paragraph</f>


   <style type="text/css">
        f[custom=h2] {
            color: green;
        }
        f[custom=p] {
            color: blue;
        }
        f[custom=speech] {
            color: yellow;
        }
        f[custom=other] {
            color: gray;
        }
    </style>
share|improve this answer
    
It's a kind of magic! Unfortunately it's impossible to me the change of the attribute name. – riccardo.tasso Jun 14 '13 at 6:28
    
you can use jQuery to provide css for these elements with .css() – Pumpkinpro Jun 16 '13 at 5:15

Your HTML is not valid. If you run it through a validator it spits out errors because it doesn't like the named embedded XML tags.

According to the HTML/XML Task Force Report:

When an HTML5 parser encounters unfamiliar markup, it assumes that such markup is an erroneous attempt to generate well-defined HTML5. Consequently, it applies error correction strategies which result in a DOM representation that can differ radically from the DOM that an XML parser would have produced. In particular, open elements may end prematurely and additional elements may be opened.

The practical result is that a “naked” XML island in an HTML5 document will not reliably produce anything that resembles the DOM one would expect from casual inspection of the XML island.

So Chrome is well within its rights to screw up here, 'cause technically you did it first. Of note is how (in my Chrome browser) all the elements are green (http://jsfiddle.net/qJMWg/) - which suggests that for some reason that all thing they're nested in a big <f type="h2"> element. That is of note because HTML does contains a <b> and <s> tag, so <f> is the first invalid one it encounters.

If we change the styles for that f\[type=h2\] rule (http://jsfiddle.net/qJMWg/1/) it affects everything - which is consistent with the idea that somehow Chrome is interpreting this XML structure incorrectly. To Chrome's CSS engine (despite what the developer tools is telling us) this somehow looks like this:

    <b>
      <s> 
        <f type="h2">Title&lt;/f&gt;
        &lt;f type="p"&gt;Paragraph&lt;/f&gt;
        &lt;f type="speech"&gt;Dialgoue&lt;/f&gt;
        &lt;f type="other" br="true"&gt;Other&lt;/f&gt;
        &lt;f type="p"&gt;Paragraph&lt;/f&gt;
        &lt;f type="p"&gt;Paragraph</f>
      </s>
    </b>
share|improve this answer
    
Actually my interpretation of the resulting DOM structure might not be quite right (http://jsfiddle.net/qJMWg/2/) but the core message is the same: this is invalid HTML and Chrome can do whatever it wants with it. – Richard JP Le Guen Jun 13 '13 at 21:57

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