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Given a memory allocation:

struct typeA *p = malloc(sizeof(struct typeA));

and then somewhere, for example, in a function, there are 2 choices:

void func(void *q)
{
     ....
    free(q);
}

void func(void *q)
{
    ....

    struct typeA *pp = (struct typeA *)q;
    free(pp); 
}

Both of them are OK or just the second is OK? Why?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Both are ok. free() only cares about the address that is stored in the pointer and that does not change when casting.

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Well, that depends on the representation and alignment requirements of the base type of the pointer. (intptr_t)p is not necessarily the same as (intptr_t)(struct TypeA *)pp. –  user529758 Jun 13 '13 at 15:15
    
Not all pointers have the same size, this is platform dependent, so cast pointer may change the value of the pointer. –  Jonatan Goebel Jun 13 '13 at 15:16
struct typeA *pp = (struct typeA *)q;

This typecast is unecessary. Also, free argument's type is a pointer to void. Therefore, the function cannot have any idea of the type of the lvalue which is used to access the object *pp. It just receives a raw pointer.

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Yes, it is.

As free() is waiting for a void pointer, your compiler will convert your pointer to void * if needed.

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It's not that the compiler will cast it - there's no cast involved, only an implicit conversion from T * to void *. –  user529758 Jun 13 '13 at 15:16
    
And it the sizeof(T *) differs from sizeof(void *)? –  Jonatan Goebel Jun 13 '13 at 15:17
    
void * is always compatible with any data pointer type, and automatic, implicit conversion from and to it occurs. –  user529758 Jun 13 '13 at 15:18
    
hum, I used the wrong expression, It was not clear to me the difference between implicit cast and conversion, going to fix the answer. I though that an "implicit cast" was a "conversion", but there is no such thing. –  Jonatan Goebel Jun 13 '13 at 15:21
    
There's no such thing as "implicit cast" :) There's explicit type conversion which is called casting, and implicit type conversion which is called coalescing or promotion. –  user529758 Jun 13 '13 at 15:28

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