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In an unsafe block, I'm trying to get a pointer to a byte array. But I get different results depending on the declared size of the array:

unsafe {

    byte[] bytes;

    bytes = new byte[1];
    fixed(void* pBytes = bytes)
    {
        ((int)pBytes).Dump(); //prints e.g. 41797644
    }

    bytes = new byte[0];
    fixed(void* pBytes = bytes)
    {
        ((int)pBytes).Dump(); //prints 0 ?!
    }
}

If I open the immediate window and type &bytes, I get the actual addresses of the byte arrays, including the case with the empty array.

Why doesn't the fixed unmanaged pointer work the same?

UPDATE:

Here's the same code and what I get from the immediate window:

unsafe {
    byte[] bytes;
    bytes = new byte[1];
    fixed(void* pBytes = bytes)
    {
                       // bytes => 
                       // {byte[1]}
                       //    [0]: 0
                       //
                       // &bytes
                       // 0x0601c34c               //the address of the variable
                       //    bytes: 0x027dc804     //the address of the array
                       //
                       // pBytes
                       // 0x027dc80c               // notice pBytes == (&bytes + 8)
                       //     *pBytes: 0
    }

    bytes = new byte[0];
    fixed(void* pBytes = bytes)
    {
                       // bytes => 
                       // {byte[0]}
                       //
                       // &bytes
                       // 0x0601c34c               //same address of the variable, ofc
                       //    bytes: 0x02aa7ad4     //different address of (new) array 
                       //
                       // pBytes
                       // 0x00000000               // BOINK
                       //     *pBytes: Cannot dereference 'pBytes'. 
                       //              The pointer is not valid.
    }
}

The 8-byte difference between the address of the array object (&bytes) and the array pointer is explained by the object's header.

The array representation in memory is:

     type id  size     elem 0   elem1    ...
----|--------|--------|--------|--------|...
    ^ 4Bytes   4Bytes ^
    |                 `--< pBytes
    `--< &bytes

The unsafe pointer actually points to the start of, well, actual data (i.e. what would be marshalled to an unmanaged context)

Is there a way I could get, in code, the actual address of the empty array?

FWIW, I actually need that to be able to get to the array's header, to modify the array's runtime-type on the fly.

share|improve this question
    
to modify the array's runtime-type on the fly - why not make a new array? Seems your approach could break type-safety for the whole process. –  Henk Holterman Jun 13 '13 at 15:44
    
I knew I'd get yelled at for that :) Ok, the use-case is converting between byte[] and sbyte[] on the fly. (Which almost works with casting, but methods like Array.Copy() don't like mixing of sbyte and byte arrays –  Cristi Diaconescu Jun 13 '13 at 15:46
2  
This question looks like a XY problem. –  Park Young-Bae Jun 13 '13 at 15:48
    
@Rakkun Possibly, but I think it's still an interesting question and I'm hoping to get some insight from it. –  Cristi Diaconescu Jun 13 '13 at 15:52
4  
Henk is correct: under no circumstances should you be messing with the internal state of the objects like this. Rather than messing around with internal state that could crash the entire runtime in order to fake out Array.Copy why not just write your own Array.Copy that allows copying byte to sbyte? –  Eric Lippert Jun 13 '13 at 15:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Why doesn't the fixed unmanaged pointer work the same?

That's a strange question. Why do you believe it should?

The contract is: when you fix an array with n elements where n > 0 you get a pointer to a buffer from which you can read and write n elements.

Now, When n is zero, null is a pointer to a buffer from which you can read and write zero elements, so as it turns out, that contract is actually met for the case where n is zero. The C# language is not required to do so. The specification says

The behavior of the fixed statement is implementation-defined if the array expression is null or if the array has zero elements.

So the implementation would be entirely within its rights to, say, throw an exception in your program. The meaning of your program is actually not defined at all by the C# language specification.

You're trying to use fixed off-label in order to do something incredibly dangerous and wrong. Don't do that. You should use fixed on an array for one thing only: to obtain a pointer to a buffer of n elements that you can read and write.

Is there a way I could get, in code, the actual address of the empty array?

Yes. Pin manually with a GCHandle.

Pinning a managed object in order to obtain its address is almost always dangerous and wrong.

I need that to be able to get to the array's header, to modify the array's runtime-type on the fly.

That's always dangerous and wrong. Don't do that under any circumstances.

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 for the sheer amount of times you said dangerous and wrong. –  Mike Christensen Jun 13 '13 at 16:12
    
Just out of curiousity is there any CIL/CLR references for the mentioned contract? I would love to read more into how pointers are handled by the CLR. –  Romoku Jun 13 '13 at 16:17
3  
@MikeChristensen: I'm just trying to be clear that what the OP is doing here is dangerous and wrong. –  Eric Lippert Jun 13 '13 at 16:17
    
@Romoku: Actually the situation is considerably worse than I implied by my text, which I shall fix up. I refer you to the C# 4.0 specification section 18.6, which states "The behavior of the fixed statement is implementation-defined if the array expression is null or if the array has zero elements." –  Eric Lippert Jun 13 '13 at 16:19
    
@Romoku googling for the quote from the spec, I found the docs on "fixed statement" on MSDN. –  Cristi Diaconescu Jun 14 '13 at 9:12

The way to get the address is to make a GCHandle.

See GCHandle to get address(pointer) of .net object

GCHandle handle;
IntPtr ptr;
byte[] bytes;

bytes = new byte[1];
handle = GCHandle.Alloc(bytes, GCHandleType.Pinned);

ptr = handle.AddrOfPinnedObject();
ptr.ToInt32().Dump(); // Prints 239580124

handle.Free();

unsafe {
    fixed(void* pBytes = bytes)
    {
        ((int)pBytes).Dump(); //prints 239580124
    }
}

bytes = new byte[0];
handle = GCHandle.Alloc(bytes, GCHandleType.Pinned);

ptr = handle.AddrOfPinnedObject();
ptr.ToInt32().Dump(); // Prints 239609660

handle.Free();

unsafe {
    fixed(void* pBytes = bytes)
    {
        ((int)pBytes).Dump(); //prints 0
    }
}

See Eric Lippert's answer for why it works like this.

share|improve this answer
    
+! Interesting. This answers the how, but not the why (regarding the null pointer). It appears that the assignment operation void* pBytes = bytes is not just dumb pointer arithmetic; it involves some logic. –  Cristi Diaconescu Jun 13 '13 at 15:59
    
I don't know the semantics of how the CLR handles pointers, so that would be left to someone with more knowledge. –  Romoku Jun 13 '13 at 16:01

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