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Below is my Enumerator List:

public enum StatusEnum
{
    Open = 1,
    Rejected = 2,
    Accepted = 3,
    Started = 4,
    Completed = 5,
    Cancelled = 6,
    Assigned = 7
}

I need to bind this to a Combobox, but, only show a few specific statuses and ignore the rest.

This is what I have so far:

public static List<Activity.StatusEnum> StatusList()
{
        IEnumerable<Activity.StatusEnum> query = Enum.GetValues(typeof(Activity.StatusEnum)).Cast<Activity.StatusEnum>()
                        .Where(x => x == Activity.StatusEnum.Open
                            || x == Activity.StatusEnum.Rejected
                            || x == Activity.StatusEnum.Accepted
                            || x == Activity.StatusEnum.Started);
        return query.ToList();
}

However, I feel that the code is little messy and is not a correct approach to bind filtered Enum list to a Combobox. Can anyone suggest a more robust way of doing this?

Update

I might need to change the Order of selection. So I need a generic solution which doesn't only get the first X number of statuses.

share|improve this question
1  
Is Activity a namespace? You can slim your code down a bit by adding a using directive, and removing the Activity references. – Robert Harvey Jun 13 '13 at 16:11
    
You've moved the goalposts. If all you want is (for now) those 4 enum values hardcoded there's nothing terribly wrong with the code you posted - although pswg's is neater. The generic solutions are in the answers, especially mine which sorts the enum values by int (otherwise they sort naturally by unsigned magnitude) and then takes(x) for you. x could easily be an argument to an extension method. – Stephen Kennedy Jun 13 '13 at 16:30
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Well if you're going to hard code the items that should be in the list anyway, why not just do this:

public static List<Activity.StatusEnum> StatusList()
{
    return new List<Activity.StatusEnum>
    { 
        Activity.StatusEnum.Open, 
        Activity.StatusEnum.Rejected, 
        Activity.StatusEnum.Accepted, 
        Activity.StatusEnum.Started 
    };
}

You could also dispose of the List<T> and just return the array itself. As long as you know these are the items you want, then there's no need for Linq.

share|improve this answer
1  
Upvoted, but he should either change the return type into the array type Activity.StatusEnum[], like you suggest, or use collection initializer syntax on the List<> (just remove the five charaters new[] and the parenthesis ()). It is crazy to allocate an array that is immediately discarded again (only the List<> is kept)! – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 13 '13 at 16:21
    
@JeppeStigNielsen Thanks, I'd forgotten about collection initializers. – p.s.w.g Jun 13 '13 at 16:34
    
Great solution thanks! +1 – Learner Jun 13 '13 at 16:45
return Enum.GetValues(typeof(Activity.StatusEnum)).Cast<Activity.StatusEnum>().Where((n, x) => x < 4);

If you want to be able to change the list of items, just add them into a List<Activity.StatusEnum> and use Contains:

var listValid = new List<Activity.StatusEnum>() { Activity.StatusEnum.Open, Activity.StatusEnum.Rejected, Activity.StatusEnum.Accepted, Activity.StatusEnum.Started };
return Enum.GetValues(typeof(Activity.StatusEnum)).Cast<Activity.StatusEnum>().Where(n => listValid.Contains(n));
share|improve this answer
1  
I was thinking along these lines, but the use of a magic number bothers me. Maybe compare to (int)StatusEnum.Started? – Robert Harvey Jun 13 '13 at 16:12
    
@RobertHarvey He said 4, not to compare against Started. It bothers me too, but this does exactly what asked. Unlike the most upvoted answer, too. – It'sNotALie. Jun 13 '13 at 16:15
    
Sorry for the confusion but, I need a solution without Take(4) as the order might change for other situations. – Learner Jun 13 '13 at 16:23
    
@Learner Fixed. – It'sNotALie. Jun 13 '13 at 16:24
    
Good use of Contains +1 – Learner Jun 13 '13 at 16:47

How about something along the lines of:

.Where(x => x <= Activity.StatusEnum.Started)
share|improve this answer
    
It's a good solution for this scenario, but I might need to change the order in future. Like just show Open, Completed and Assigned. – Learner Jun 13 '13 at 16:18
1  
@RobertHarvey I'd prefer to make a List and use Contains tbh – It'sNotALie. Jun 13 '13 at 16:26
    
What the heck is <= I have not seen that before!? :) Is that meant to be lest or equal or some other linq function I have never seen before? – ppumkin Nov 15 '13 at 13:54

". . . only show the first 4 statuses and ignore the rest."

To get the first n elements of an IEnumerable<T>, use the Take method:

return Enum.GetValues(typeof(Activity.StatusEnum))
    .Cast<Activity.StatusEnum>()
    .Take(4)
    .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
Very sorry for the confusion about quoted text. Please see the update. But this will help me. +1 – Learner Jun 13 '13 at 16:28

First, if possible, I'd make your enum values powers of 2, so they could be OR'd together.

public enum StatusEnum
{
    Open = 1,
    Rejected = 2,
    Accepted = 4,
    Started = 8,
    Completed = 16,
    Cancelled = 32,
    Assigned = 64
}

Then you could do something like this:

public static List<Activity.StatusEnum> StatusList()
{
    var statusesToShow = Activity.StatusEnum.Open | Activity.StatusEnum.Rejected | Activity.StatusEnum.Accepted | Activity.StatusEnum.Started;

    return Enum
        .GetValues(typeof(Activity.StatusEnum))
        .Cast<Activity.StatusEnum>()
        .Where(x => (x & statusesToShow) == x)
        .ToList();
}

EDIT: In light of the fact that you can't change the enum values, I'd just recommend you use something like:

public static List<Activity.StatusEnum> StatusList()
{
    return new List<Activity.StatusEnum> {
        Activity.StatusEnum.Open, 
        Activity.StatusEnum.Rejected, 
        Activity.StatusEnum.Accepted, 
        Activity.StatusEnum.Started
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion but I am using objects which I don't have control over. +1 for solution. – Learner Jun 13 '13 at 16:30
    
@Learner: In that case, you don't need to use Enum.GetValues at all, and can just initialize a List<T> with the known enums, which would be much easier. I'd also recommend using an IEnumerable<T> instead of List<T>, unless the binding specifically requires a List<T>. – Chris Doggett Jun 13 '13 at 16:36
    
May I know the reason for recommending IEnumerable<T>? – Learner Jun 13 '13 at 16:39
1  
In general, it's considered a best practice to prefer using interfaces over specific implementations. If your code that calls this expects an IEnumerable<T>, it doesn't matter if the function itself uses List<T>, HashSet<T>, T[] (array), or any other implementation. It would only care that there's a number of items it can iterate over. It would also prevent code that called it from calling .Add() on the List<T>. Basically, you just want to give users what they NEED access to, and nothing more. It's probably overkill for this, but it's just generally a good practice. – Chris Doggett Jun 13 '13 at 16:42
    
Awesome, thanks! – Learner Jun 13 '13 at 16:59
return Enum.GetValues(typeof(Activity.StatusEnum))
.Cast<Activity.StatusEnum>()
.OrderBy(se =>(int)se)
.Take(4);

I find LINQPad invaluable for stuff like this. This is what I have in LINQPad with "Language" set to "C# Program":

void Main()
{
    Activity.StatusList().Dump();
    Enum.GetValues(typeof(Activity.StatusEnum)).Cast<Activity.StatusEnum>().OrderBy(se =>(int)se).Take(4).Dump();
}

// Define other methods and classes here
public static class Activity {
public enum StatusEnum
{
    Open = 1,
    Rejected = 10, // changed to 10 for testing
    Accepted = 3,
    Started = 4,
    Completed = 5,
    Cancelled = 6,
    Assigned = 7,
}

public static List<StatusEnum> StatusList()
{
        IEnumerable<Activity.StatusEnum> query = Enum.GetValues(typeof(Activity.StatusEnum)).Cast<Activity.StatusEnum>()
                        .Where(x => x == Activity.StatusEnum.Open
                            || x == Activity.StatusEnum.Rejected
                            || x == Activity.StatusEnum.Accepted
                            || x == Activity.StatusEnum.Started);
        return query.ToList();
}

}

share|improve this answer
    
Good solution! +1 – Learner Jun 13 '13 at 16:36

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