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In java tutorials,

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/constructors.html

You don't have to provide any constructors for your class, but you must be careful when doing this. The compiler automatically provides a no-argument, default constructor for any class without constructors. This default constructor will call the no-argument constructor of the superclass. In this situation, the compiler will complain if the superclass doesn't have a no-argument constructor so you must verify that it does. If your class has no explicit superclass, then it has an implicit superclass of Object, which does have a no-argument constructor.

Can anyone provide me with an example where is this compile error possible?

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marked as duplicate by Guillaume, Brian Roach, Keppil, Lion, Graviton Jun 14 '13 at 7:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Didn't somebody ask this very question earlier today? –  Sebastian Redl Jun 13 '13 at 16:38
2  
This question has been asked many times with the same answers. Once such example: stackoverflow.com/questions/5286348/…. My suggestion, please do a quick google search before posting questions. You would get tons of answers faster and reduce dupes here. –  MickJ Jun 13 '13 at 16:46
    
@Sebastian: Yes one was asked and deleted 4 hours ago. - stackoverflow.com/questions/17087267/… –  MickJ Jun 13 '13 at 16:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
class A
{
    int a;
    A(int a)
    {
        this.a=a;
    }
}

class B extends A
{
    B(int a)
    {
        this.a=a;
    }
}

class C 
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        B obj=new B(20);
        System.out.println("a = "+obj.a);
    }
}


Error:Constructor A in class A cannot be applied to given types;
{
^
required: int
found:no arguments
reason: actual and formal argument lists differ in length
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class A
{
    public A(int n)
    {

    }
}

class B extends A
{

}
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And yes SO I'm a humain being! :) –  Pragmateek Jun 13 '13 at 16:38

Say you have a Super class

class Super {

 // no constructor
 // Java compiler will assign a default constructor
 // Super () {} 

}

and a Child class

class Child extends Super {

      public Child() {
          //super(); --> this statement will be inserted by default by Java compiler, even though you don't put it in your code
      }

}

And If Super is like this

class Super {

  Super(int a) {
    // Now this is the only constructor Super class has
    // Java doesn't insert a default constructor now..
  }

}

Child cannot have no argument constructor, because Super doesn't have it anymore

class `Child` {

  Child() {
     // super();
     //this will be error since there is no "no-argument" constructor in Super
  }

}
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There is a case, however, when the Child class in this case can have a default constructor. This is when the no-arg constructor makes a call to super() with an argument, e.g. super(0) or super(5). –  deleteme Jul 16 '13 at 21:46

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