Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Relatively new to python. I recently posted a question in regards to validating that a data type is boolean. [http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1708349/use-a-single-decorator-for-multiple-attributes%5D%5B1%5D

The answers given referenced duck typing. I have a simple example, and want to make sure I understand. If my code is:

class Foo4(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.bool1=True

    def send_rocket(self, bool_value):
        if not bool_value:
            print "Send rocket ship to sun first... bad move."
         print "Send rocket ship to Mars... good move."

f=Foo4()
f.send_rocket(f.bool1) 
#Send rocket ship to Mars... good move.

f.bool1=None
f.send_rocket(f.bool1) 
#Send rocket ship to sun first... bad move.
#Send rocket ship to Mars... good move.

If I understand duck typing somewhat correctly, in the above class I trust that bool1 will always be a boolean value: I should not be checking whether bool1 == False or bool1 == True. When someone uses my module incorrectly, ie, bool1 = None, the method exectues something I would not have wanted performed without indication there was a problem... and the people in the rocketship die.

Another way I could have written the code to ensure bool1 is always a true boolean would be (credits for BooleanDescriptor in link above!):

class BooleanDescriptor(object):
    def __init__(self, attr):
        self.attr = attr

    def __get__(self, instance, owner):
        return getattr(instance, self.attr)

    def __set__(self, instance, value):
        if value in (True, False):
            return setattr(instance, self.attr, value)
        else:
            raise TypeError

class Foo4(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._bool1=True
    bool1 = BooleanDescriptor('_bool1')

    def send_rocket(self, bool_value):
        if not bool_value:
            print "Send rocket ship to sun... bad move."
        print "Send rocket ship to Mars... good move."

f=Foo4()
f.send_rocket(f.bool1)
#Send rocket ship to Mars... good move.

f.bool1=None
#TypeError.
#Never gets here: f.send_rocket(f.bool1)

Do I understand the first way to go (not checking) is the correct way to go? I mean, I could always have written the code explicitly in the first example as:

    if bool_value ==True:
        print "do something"
    elif bool_value == False:
        print "do something else"
    else:
        print "invalid boolean value"

But if I do that in every method et cetera where I use bool1, why in the heck would I just not have validate that bool1 was a true boolean value in the first place (DRY!)!?!? :-)

Thanks!

Paul

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The usual Python style is the first approach.

For example, I may want to use your library with something that cannot decide whether to go to the sun or to mars until the very last moment. So I might pass in an instance of this class:

class LastMinuteDecision(object):

    def __bool__(self):
        return make_decision_now()

If you had stuck some tests in there, thinking you knew better than me how I was going to call your library, then I couldn't do that, and I would be very annoyed and probably tell you to stop writing Java (or whatever) in Python...

[edit: in case it's not clear, the __bool__ method makes the instance "look like" a boolean. It is called when the language expects a boolean value.]

You might think it crazy, but it works surprisingly well.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'd expect that wrapping a dynamically typed value with a class that forces it to be, essentially, statically typed is not the way to go.

I'm not an expert, but I expect that your final method is the best one (i.e. check for true, false, or else).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.