Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two tables with very similar structures.

Universidades
nombre | contenido | becas | fotos etc etc etc
Internados
nombre | todo | becas | fotos etc etc etc

I want to write an SQL statement that will select the nombre from both of them and return it as an array only when it matches. From what I have seen UNION SELECT seems to be the way to do this. I added WHERE on the end and I think this is where its going wrong. So far I am receiving the first row of the first table.

What am I typing wrong?

$db = new PDO(DB_DSN, DB_USERNAME, DB_PASSWORD);
$data = $db->prepare("SELECT nombre FROM internados UNION SELECT nombre FROM universidades WHERE nombre = ?");
$data->execute(array($nombre));

apologies, I want to retrive one result from these two tables. Namees in the nombre column are all individual and different in both tables

share|improve this question
    
What does "return it as an array only when it matches" mean? –  ErikE Jun 13 '13 at 16:56
    
Return all information from that row in array format when nombre is equal to the value passed to it –  Adam Brown Jun 13 '13 at 16:59
    
What DBMS and version, please? Also, what does "an array format" mean? In SQL there are rows and columns. That is it! –  ErikE Jun 13 '13 at 17:08
    
I'm using MAMP. I'm passing the info into a variable and making it an array, $info = $data->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC) –  Adam Brown Jun 13 '13 at 17:13
    
So it sounds like you want one row per nombre, but only if it appears in both tables. –  ErikE Jun 13 '13 at 17:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One issue to point out before we solve the problem is that each query in a UNION is distinct and requires its own WHERE clause. The only clause that applies to the UNION as a whole is ORDER BY. So your query as is needs some tweaking:

SELECT nombre
FROM dbo.internados
WHERE nombre = ? -- the added line
UNION
SELECT nombre
FROM dbo.universidades
WHERE nombre = ?
;

Second, if you want the two tables to both have the same nombre (which is not completely clear but I'm guessing that's right), then that won't work because it simply returns one nombre if the value is found in either table. Probably the best way to solve this is to just do a join:

SELECT I.nombre
FROM
   dbo.internados I
   INNER JOIN dbo.universidades U
      ON I.nombre = U.nombre
WHERE
   I.nombre = ?
   AND U.nombre = ? -- perhaps not needed, but perhaps helpful
;

I am not 100% sure that I understand exactly what you're looking for, so please speak up if I've missed the mark.

You can think about JOIN and UNION this way:

  • JOIN: connects rows horizontally
    • Matches them on conditions
    • Creates new columns
    • Doesn't exactly create rows because all data comes from existing rows, but it will duplicate a row from one input when the conditions match multiple rows in the other input. If both inputs have duplicates then it multiplies the count of rows from one input by the count of matching rows from the other.
    • If there is no match condition at all (think CROSS JOIN) then you can get a cartesian product which is each row in one input matched to each row in the other.
    • When using an OUTER join--LEFT, RIGHT, FULL--if rows from the inner input (or either input with FULL) do not match the other, NULLs will be placed into the columns for the other input.
  • UNION: stacks rows vertically
    • Generally, creates new rows
    • No conditions are used, there is no real matching
    • UNION by itself (not UNION ALL) will remove duplicate rows, even if one input has no rows

Note that the UNION could be modified to do the job, though this is not ideal:

SELECT nombre
FROM (
   SELECT nombre
   FROM dbo.internados
   WHERE nombre = ?
   UNION ALL
   SELECT nombre
   FROM dbo.universidades
   WHERE nombre = ?
) N
GROUP BY nombre
HAVING Count(*) = 2
;

In this way we ensure there are two values. Note this assumes that there can't be two of the same name in each table. If that's true, more work would be needed to make the UNION method do the job.

share|improve this answer
2  
Thank you this is a great explanation of JOIN and UNION. I think I misundertood them at first and I need to restructure this. –  Adam Brown Jun 13 '13 at 17:15
3  
I added a little more detail about JOIN and UNION. –  ErikE Jun 13 '13 at 17:33
    
and shall I add +1 for the correct version of the union that uses group by and having. That's how we were taught things at school (along with the teachers always saying "don't use unions or subqueries, joins FTW!") –  zmo Jun 14 '13 at 0:51
    
@zmo Thanks a bunch! –  ErikE Jun 14 '13 at 1:22

most of the time a union can be achieved by doing a join:

SELECT nombre 
  FROM internados 
UNION 
SELECT nombre 
  FROM universidades 
 WHERE nombre = ?

would better be:

SELECT nombre
  FROM internados i
  JOIN universidades u
    ON i.nombre = u.nombre
   AND nombre = ?

which is way simpler to read. (you may also use the JOIN syntax, but I prefer plain old manual joins).

But whether this is a union or a join, always remember that both tables get merged in the result:

nombre | todo | becas | fotos | ... | contenido | becas | ...

so basically, as you put a condition on nombre, you'll either get an empty set, or the name you've given to the query. But hthe way you've written your union, only the second set gets the where condition applied, not the first one. You shall put the condition on both of the queries of the union:

SELECT nombre 
  FROM internados 
 WHERE nombre = ?
UNION 
SELECT nombre 
  FROM universidades 
 WHERE nombre = ?
share|improve this answer
2  
Old-style non-ANSI joins? In 2013!?!? What is the world coming to? I cannot recommend this. –  ErikE Jun 13 '13 at 16:58
2  
ok, ok, fixing this, you're right it's time I get in SQL's XXIst century ;-) –  zmo Jun 13 '13 at 17:02
2  
I was being histrionic, but thanks for listening. :) –  ErikE Jun 13 '13 at 17:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.