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Below I am giving two programs and their outputs.

code1:

   #include<iostream>
    using namespace std;

    template <class X,class Y> X sumargs(X a,Y b)
    {
        cout<<"\nThe sum is :" << a+b; 

    }

    int sumargs(int a,char b)
    {
      cout<<"\nThis works\n";
      return 1;
    }

    int main()
    {

        sumargs<int>(1,2);
        sumargs<char>(4,9.0);
        sumargs<double>('d',8);
        sumargs(7,'a');
        return 0;
    }

output 1:

The sum is :3
The sum is :13
The sum is :108
This works

code 2:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

template <class X,class Y> X sumargs(X a,Y b)
{
    cout<<"\nThe sum is :" << a+b; 

}

int sumargs(int a,char b)
{
  cout<<"\nThis works\n";
  return 1;
}

int main()
{

    sumargs<int>(1,2);
    sumargs<char>(4,9.0);
    sumargs<double>('d',8);
    sumargs<int>(7,'a');
    return 0;
}

output 2:

The sum is :3
The sum is :13
The sum is :108
The sum is :104

Why is sumargs(7,'a'); in the code 2 not calling the explicitly overloaded version of the function?

share|improve this question
    
Your first sumargs shouldn't even compile; it never returns a value despite claiming that it does. –  Sebastian Redl Jun 13 '13 at 16:57
    
@SebastianRedl: Why doesn't it detect the error? I am using g++ compiler. –  Inquisitive Jun 13 '13 at 17:04
    
Use -Wall -Werror. g++ is annoyingly lenient sometimes. –  Sebastian Redl Jun 13 '13 at 17:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here:

sumargs<int>(7,'a');
//     ^^^^^

You are specifying template arguments explicitly. Since you are explicitly specifying template arguments, the compiler will only consider function templates to resolve the call.

Your overload is not a template, and non-templates do not accept template arguments. Therefore, the compiler will not consider it.

share|improve this answer
    
isn't that <int> for return type? –  Inquisitive Jun 13 '13 at 16:57
1  
@Inquisitive: Yes, but it is still a template argument. Non-templates do not have template arguments. Since you are using them, only function templates are considered by the compiler –  Andy Prowl Jun 13 '13 at 16:58

In addition to Andy Prowl's answer, note that you can use template specialization for what you are doing:

template<>
int sumargs<int,char>(int a,char b)
{
  cout<<"\nThis works\n";
  return 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was late :) I will delete mine –  aah134 Jun 13 '13 at 17:13

you should used

template <>
int sumargs<int,char>(int a,char b)
{
   cout<<"\nThis works\n";
   return 1;
}

try special functions template

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