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I have these nested divs and I need the main container to expand (in height) to accomodate the DIVs inside

    <!-- head -->
    ...
    <!-- /head -->

    <body class="main">
      <div id="container">
        <div id="header">
          <!--series of divs in here, graphic banner etc. -->
        </div>

    <div id="main_content"> <!-- this DIV _should_ stretch to accomodate inner divs -->
      <div id="items_list" class="items_list ui-sortable">
        <div id="item_35" class="item_details">
        </div>
        <div id="item_36" class="item_details">
        </div>        
        <div id="item_37" class="item_details">
        </div>
        <!-- this list of DIVs "item_xx" goes on for a while
             each one representing a photo with name, caption etcetc -->
      </div>
    </div>
    <br class="clear"/>

    <div id="footer">
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

CSS is this:

* {
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0;
}

.main {
    font: 100% Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
    background: #4c5462;
    margin: 0; 
    padding: 0;
    text-align: center; 
    color: #000000;
}
.main #container {
    height: auto;
    width: 46em;
    background: #4c5462;
    margin: 0 auto; 
    border: 0px solid #000000;
    text-align: left;       
}

.main #main_content {
    padding: 5px;
    margin: 0px;
}
#items_list {
    width: 400px;
    float: left;
}

.items_list {
    width: 400px;
    float: left;
}
.item_details {
    margin-top: 3px;
    margin-bottom: 3px;
    padding: 3px;
    float: left;
    border-bottom: 0.5px solid blue;
}

The problem I have is that #main_content doesn't stretch to accomodate all the inner divs, with the result that they keep going against the background.

How can I solve this?

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2  
Guys thank you all for the answers! the best solution for my specific case was to hard-code a BR to clear both sides (thanks Jennyfofenny and also Ricebowl) Anyway, also other solutions have worked: putting overflow:auto was ok, and floating #main_content was also ok (although ir reduced the width of that div to the size of child divs). Now being a newbie I'm wondering: do these solutions have drawbacks, or I can use them indifferently? (eg. maybe one of them doesn't work with IE6, or similar...) –  patrick Nov 10 '09 at 18:56
    
@Patrick, if you want to further develop your question, click on the 'edit' link (below the current text of the question) and add in the further questions. Convention suggests using something like <strong>Edited</strong>$Reason_for_revising_question... You may need to change the question title to reflect the changes if there's a major change or addition in its focus. =) –  David Thomas Nov 10 '09 at 22:32
1  
You also never closed the div tag with id='container'. That could cause some problems. –  Batkins Jun 22 '12 at 15:37
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15 Answers

up vote 105 down vote accepted

You need to force a clear:both before the #main_content div is closed. I would probably move the <br class="clear" />; into the #main_content div and set the CSS to be:

.clear { clear: both; }
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Interesting, what does clear do exactly? –  Roozbeh15 Jan 23 '12 at 20:32
1  
Here's the w3schools article on the CSS clear property. Basically, clear means that the element the clear is applied to begins below the floats in its flow (either only left, only right or both). –  jennyfofenny Jan 27 '12 at 19:22
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Try this: overflow: auto;

It worked for my problem..

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3  
This adds scroll bars. I don't like that! –  Roozbeh15 Jan 23 '12 at 20:36
    
@Roozbeh15 - I don't see any scrollbars –  Nabil Kadimi May 12 '13 at 23:57
3  
+1, This solution is elegant and doesn't add an invisible tag to your page. See this fiddle: jsfiddle.net/XmKrm/1 –  Nabil Kadimi May 12 '13 at 23:59
    
+1 Worked like a charm. Thanks :) –  kevin Jun 19 '13 at 10:23
    
Also solved similar problem. No scroll bar added:) Thanks –  quapka Apr 5 at 10:08
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add the following:

overflow:hidden;
height:1%;

to your main div. Eliminates the need for the extra <br /> for the clear.

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thanks mate - I was pulling my hair out! –  Lawrence Tierney May 25 '12 at 14:35
    
wow! that did the exact opposite of what i would have expected! overflow: hidden = expand to fit content! i never would have guessed that! –  mulllhausen Mar 7 '13 at 10:32
    
Yes, this worked for me too and it doesn't fully make sense why. Any explanation why the 'height 1%' and 'overflow hidden' work? –  acarlon Oct 1 '13 at 3:31
    
Elegant and clever! It still works without 'height:1%'. –  Amy Oct 6 '13 at 12:15
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Use the span tag with display:inline-block css attached to it. You can then use CSS and manipulate it like a div in lots of ways but if you don't include a width or height it expands and retracts based on its content.

Hope that helps.

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Your hoping worked: it at least helped me! :) Btw, I left my element as a div (instead of a span) but display: inline-block still worked in my case (Chromium). –  snapfractalpop Dec 11 '12 at 4:57
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Thw following should work:

.main #main_content {
    padding: 5px;
    margin: 0px;
    overflow: auto;
    width: 100%; //for some explorer browsers to trigger hasLayout
}
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adding overflow: auto worked, although if I add also width: 100%, that causes the div (#main_content) to be slightly bigger than it's parent div. Didn't get why! –  patrick Nov 10 '09 at 18:59
2  
that's because the padding counts in addition to the width specified, so the width of your element is 100% + 5px left padding + 5px right padding –  NickV Jul 13 '11 at 10:20
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Typically I think this can be resolved by forcing a clear:both rule on the last child-element of the #items_list.

You can either use:

#items_list:last-child {clear: both;}

Or, if you're using a dynamic language, add an additional class to the last element generated in whatever loop creates the list itself, so you end up with something in your html like:

<div id="list_item_20" class="last_list_item">

and css

.last_list_item {clear: both; }
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as an alternative way you can also try this that may be usefull in some situations

display:table;

jsFiddle

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add a float property to the main_content div - it will then expand to contain its floated contents

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Thanks Ray, this worked although it shrunk the div to the size of it's content (#items_list) which has width: 400px; Your solution would be really good if I could make #main_content stay to its full width - any suggestions? –  patrick Nov 10 '09 at 19:06
    
@Ray 2 and a bit years later and this just saved me a potential headache with a similar problem. Thank you! –  John H Jan 8 '12 at 20:03
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Looks like this works

html {
 width:100%;
 height:auto;
 min-height:100%
} 

It takes the screen size as minimum, and if the content expands it grows.

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I'm running into this on a project myself - I had a table inside a div that was spilling out of the bottom of the div. None of the height fixes I tried worked, but I found a weird fix for it, and that is to put a paragraph at the bottom of the div with just a period in it. Then style the "color" of the text to be the same as the background of the container. Worked neat as you please and no javascript required. A non-breaking space will not work - nor does a transparent image.

Apparently it just needed to see that there is some content below the table in order to stretch to contain it. I wonder if this will work for anyone else.

This is the sort of thing that makes designers resort to table-based layouts - the amount of time I've spent figuring this stuff out and making it cross-browser compatible is driving me crazy.

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In CSS: #clear_div{clear:both;}

After the div tag of the inner div add this new following div

<div id="clear_div"></div>

http://www.w3schools.com/cssref/pr_class_clear.asp : for more information

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I would just use

height: auto;

in your div. Yes, I know I'm a-little late but I figured this might help somebody like it would have helped me if it was here.

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If you are using jQuery UI, they already have a class the works just a charm add a <div> at the bottom inside the div that you want expand with height:auto; then add a class name ui-helper-clearfix or use this style attribute and add just like below:

<div style=" clear:both; overflow:hidden; height:1%; "></div>

add jQuery UI class to the clear div, not the div the you want to expand.

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I know this is kind of old thread, however, this can be achieved with min-height CSS property in a clean way, so I'll leave this here for future references:

I made a fiddle based on the OP posted code here: http://jsfiddle.net/U5x4T/1/, as you remove and add divs inside, you'll notice how does the container expands or reduces in size

The only 2 things you need to achieve this, additional to the OP code is:

*Overflow in the main container (required for the floating divs)

*min-height css property, more info available here: http://www.w3schools.com/cssref/pr_dim_min-height.asp

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This problem arises when the Child elements of a Parent Div are floated. Here is the Latest Solution of the problem:

In your CSS file write the following class called .clearfix along with the pseudo selector :after

.clearfix:after {
content: "";
display: table;
clear: both;
}

Then, in your HTML, add the .clearfix class to your parent Div. For example:

<div class="clearfix">
    <div></div>
    <div></div>
</div>

It should work always. You can call the class name as .group instead of .clearfix , as it will make the code more semantic. Note that, it is Not necessary to add the dot or even a space in the value of Content between the double quotation "". Also, overflow: auto; might solve the problem but it causes other problems like showing the scroll-bar and is not recommended.

Source: Blog of Lisa Catalano and Chris Coyier

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