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Consider the two code segments below. Which one is better and Why? If you have any other idea, please do mention. Where can I find answers to coding practices like these? If you are aware of any book / article, please do share.

//Code 1

bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport(){
    bool retval = false;
    do{
        if (!isAdmin()){
            break;
        }
        if (!isConditionOne()){
            break;
        }
        if (!isConditionTwo()){
            break;
        }
        if (!isConditionThree()){
            break;
        }

        retval = generateReport();
    } while(0);
    return retval;
}

//Code2

bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport(){
    if (!isAdmin()  || !isConditionOne() || !isConditionTwo() || !isConditionThree()){
        return false;
    }
    return generateReport();
}

The clean code by Robert C. Martin is a nice book which deals with this. But, I guess that book is inclined towards Java.

UPDATE:

  1. I have purposefully used do{ }while(0); loop as I did not wanted to use goto.

  2. I wanted to get rid of so many if and break statements, so I proposed Code 2.

What I can see from the replies is a mixed set of responses for both the Code1 and Code2. There are people who prefer goto as well compared to Code 1 (which I thought was better).

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The more ways you have of exiting a loop/function, the more likely a maintenance programmer who needs to modify it in a few years will screw it up. –  Bill Nov 10 '09 at 19:11
    
@Bill: That's true if the return statements are scattered all over the place. If you have "guard clauses" (as in Andy's solution) the return statements representing error conditions are all gathered together and make the remaining code very clean. –  Graeme Perrow Nov 10 '09 at 19:44
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17 Answers

up vote 37 down vote accepted

I don't really like using a do/while loop in this way. One other way to do this would be to break your conditional in Code2 into separate if checks. These are sometimes referred to as "guard clauses."

bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport()
{
    if (!isAdmin())
        return false;

    if (!isConditionOne())
        return false;

    // etc.

    return generateReport();

}
share|improve this answer
12  
Amen! I never understood the mentality that "early returns are not allowed". It leads to precisely this kind of mess, where a poor coder feels like they have to be forced between perverting a loop construct and using a goto. –  Andy Ross Nov 10 '09 at 18:55
2  
Also, this technique is safer than putting lots of function calls in one if statement, if any of those functions have side effects, given that the order of evaluation may not be guaranteed. –  Steve Melnikoff Nov 10 '09 at 20:31
1  
@Steve: the order of evaluation is very much guaranteed to be left-to-right, &&-before-||, unless you've overloaded operator&& and/or operator||, and then you should be punished for that (unless you're a boost contributer - they're allowed :) –  Marc Mutz - mmutz Apr 8 '11 at 16:29
    
@mmutz: I think me-from-6-months-ago might have been thinking about lazy evaluation, e.g. if(MyFunc1() && MyFunc2()) {...} - unless the standard states that if the first operand is false, the second must not be evaluated. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/1354138/…. –  Steve Melnikoff Apr 9 '11 at 17:20
    
@Steve: Yes, the standard guarantees that for logical operators. The question you reference is about bit-wise &, which is a different beast. –  Marc Mutz - mmutz Apr 18 '11 at 8:58
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I would personally prefer a variation on your second code segment. The short circuiting will work the same, but the conditional is less verbose.

bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport()
{
    if(isAdmin() && isConditionOne() && isConditionTwo() && isConditionThree())
    {
        return generateReport();
    }

    return false;
}

It says everything in one nice clean spot. "If all these conditions are met, then do this. Otherwise, don't."

I feel like your first code segment makes that logic harder to see by spreading the condition across 12 lines. Also, the encasing loop might cause someone to do a double take.

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+1! This makes so much more sense to me. –  olive Nov 10 '09 at 17:50
    
+1: Much better to convert the tests into positives rather than negatives. –  Greg Beech Nov 10 '09 at 18:20
    
Hope 'OR' is preferred over 'AND' in a check like that one, like if first one becomes true(isAdmin() - false) in if ( !isAdmin() || ) then flow will probably skip checking other conditions. –  Manikanda raj S Jan 12 '13 at 10:42
    
@Manikanda I would expect the short-circuiting to work the same in both cases. If we're ANDing conditions, then if any condition is false, the flow should "skip checking other conditions" (AKA short circuit). On the other hand, if we are ORing negated conditions, then again, if a condition is false, there should be a short circuit. I am of the opinion that the ANDed syntax is more readable that the negated OR syntax. –  csj Jan 14 '13 at 21:21
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bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport()
{
   return isAdmin()  
      && isConditionOne() 
      && isConditionTwo()
      && isConditionThree()
      && generateReport();    // Everything's ok.
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1, nice use of short circuit evaluation. –  AshleysBrain Nov 10 '09 at 17:49
2  
Nice, but for me just a tad too "clever". As I read it I need to mentally change gear when I reach the generatReport() expression. –  djna Nov 10 '09 at 17:52
1  
NO, don't do this. It's even worse than emulating goto with switch and break. –  erikkallen Nov 10 '09 at 18:20
1  
Then place a breakpoint on line 'isConditionThree()' or directly inside the function. Or comment out conditions as needed if you want to test specific conditions/combinations. –  Houlalala Nov 10 '09 at 18:30
1  
This code only really works when your function returns a boolean. For the debugging reason @Graeme mentioned and the reduced readability mentioned by @djna, it's much better to break each test into one-liner short circuits. Also, easier to diff in source control later. –  Harvey Jan 10 '11 at 21:39
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It really depends on the future expectations of the code. Code1 above implies that there may be additional logic to be added for each of the conditions; Code2 above implies rather that there is a rational grouping of the conditionals. Code1 may be more relevant if you expect to add logic for the conditions at a later date; if you don't, though, Code2 is probably more sensible because of the brevity and implied grouping.

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bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport(){
    if ( ! isAdmin         () ) return false ;
    if ( ! isConditionOne  () ) return false ;
    if ( ! isConditionTwo  () ) return false ;
    if ( ! isConditionThree() ) return false ;
    return generateReport() ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1: this is the simplest and cleanest solution here. –  Graeme Perrow Nov 10 '09 at 18:05
1  
this is andy's solution presented beautifully :) –  Devil Jin Nov 10 '09 at 21:32
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Code 1 is, IMO, worst as it does not immediately convey the intendend meaning which is to generate the repoort only in certain circumstances.

Using:

   if (condition_1) return false;
   if (condition_2) return false;
   ...

would be better.

Also, what I dislike in code 1 is the fact that it try to mask gotos using a while and breaks (which are gotos). I would then prefer to use directly a goto, at least it would have been easier to see where the landing point is.

Code 2 might be formatted to look nicely, I guess:

 bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport(){
     if (!isAdmin()        || !isConditionOne() ||
         !isConditionTwo() || !isConditionThree()) {
        return false;
     }
     return generateReport();
 }

Or something similar.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for just using a goto rather than do/while to imitate a goto. Gotos aren't always evil. –  Graeme Perrow Nov 10 '09 at 17:59
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Which on do you think best expresses what the code is trying to say. Which one do you need to work hardest to understand?

I would do this:

bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport(){
    if (isAdmin()  && isConditionOne() && isConditionTwo() && isConditionThree()){
         return generateReport();
    } else {
        return false;
    }

}

Because:

a). Prefer to say what I want rather than what I don't want b). prefer symmetry, if and else. Clearly all cases covered.

share|improve this answer
    
You beat me to it. –  csj Nov 10 '09 at 17:26
    
This is nice but the the else isn't necessary... –  olive Nov 10 '09 at 17:54
    
Not necessary but (IMHO) better style. For the reason I tried to explain. The balance of if and else makes it easier to understand the intent of the author. My objective is to write clear code, not to use the most minimal construct. –  djna Nov 10 '09 at 20:22
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I prefer a modification of sample 2:

bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport()
{
    bool returnValue = false;
    if (isAdmin() &&
        isConditionOne() &&
        isConditionTwo() &&
        isConditionThree())
    { 
        returnValue = generateReport();
    } 
    return returnValue;
}

It has the benefit of having a single exit point for the function, which is recommended for easier maintenance. I find stacking conditions vertically instead of horizontally easier to read quickly, and it's a lot easier to comment individual conditions if you need to.

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This one i prefer, it's much simpler and cool if you use a single return statement in a function. Forcing this habit of using single return will make us code more readable and helpful in a large project. –  Manikanda raj S Jan 12 '13 at 10:45
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I like the answers that are a variation of version 2, but just to give an alternative: If those conditions are logically tied together, chances are that you will need to check for them again in other places. If this is true, then maybe a helper function would do the job better. Something like this:

bool isReportable(anyParametersNeeded){
    //stuffYouWantToCheck
}

bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport(){
    if (isReportable(anyParametersNeeded)){
        return generateReport();
    }
    return false;
}

As this function is small, maybe you can even inline it (or let the compiler decide ;)). Another bonus is that if you want to include some extra checks in the future, you only have to change that function and not every spot where it's used.

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All you've done is move the style problem to isReportable() which will now look exactly the same as other examples here except the last line will be return true;. –  Harvey Jan 10 '11 at 21:42
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Regarding example 1: If you want goto, why don't you write goto??? It's much clearer than your suggestion. And considering that goto should only be used rarely, I vote for #2.

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False dichotomy. There are more alternatives, and both codes shown are particularly hideous. Although #2 is at least logical. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 10 '09 at 17:55
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My habit is to avoid if-blocks this way:

bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport(){
    bool report = !( isAdmin()        || isConditionOne() || 
                     isConditionTwo() || isConditionThree() );
    return report ? generateReport() : false; 
}
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Personally I prefer sample 2. It groups those items that will not result in the report being generated together.

As far as general coding guidelines, the book Code Complete (Amazon) is a good reference for coding style issues.

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A switch would be a better solution to your problem I think. You would need to overload the method to take in an int param and I don't know if that's something you would want to do or not.

Bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport(int i)
{
  switch(i)
  {
    case 1:
       // do something
       break;
    case 2:
       // do something
       break;
   // etc
 }
 return GeneratReport()
}

Not really sure what your plan is since you're calling the method recursively and as some point you will want to leave the method.

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Code Complete is a commonly recommended book that goes into some detail about those kinds of stylistic issues. Also consider taking a look at some of the published organization style guides to see if they have any opinions on the issue; Google's Style Guide, for instance.

As to what I prefer, the second example is much better to my mind. The first is essentially an abuse of the do {} while construct to avoid using a goto, dogmatically sticking to the letter of "avoid gotos at all cost" while missing its spirit of "code for clarity, don't use unobvious language tricks".

In fact, the only reason to even use a goto at all would be to dogmatically stick to a "only one return statement per function" approach when you could get away with a simple, readable

if (!isAdmin()){
    return false;
}
else if (!isConditionOne()){
    return false;    }
else if (!isConditionTwo()){
    return false;    }
else if (!isConditionThree()){
    return false;    }
else
    return generateReport();

Other thoughts?

Don't name local variables that are used to hold a computed success state "returnValue" or similar. Obviously whatever you return is the return value, any one who can read C can see what is being returned. Tell me what computation it holds. The name "returnValue" gives me no information as to what it means when it is true or false. In this example "couldGenerateReports" or similar would be far more preferable.

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Personally I prefer my for, while and do ... while loops to be actual loops. In the first code example this is not the case. So I would opt for example 2. Or, as others have already said, for breaking example 2 into a number of if ... return statements.

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I've used similar to both in different circumstances but you've overcomplicated the first IMO:

bool MyApplication::ReportGenerator::GenerateReport(){
    bool retval = false;
    if (!isAdmin()){
    }
    else if (!isConditionOne()){
    }
    else if (!isConditionTwo()){
    }
    else if (!isConditionThree()){
    }
    else
        retval = generateReport();
    return retval;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Empty if blocks are ugly. –  Graeme Perrow Nov 10 '09 at 18:00
    
I dislike the missing statements following the leading if/else if's. It looks incomplete or unfinished and I have to puzzle out what your intent was. –  John Watts Nov 10 '09 at 18:52
    
Far better than a do while with breaks... imo –  Patrick Nov 10 '09 at 23:03
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