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I'm running this code, but why the output result of m is always zero here?

This is very strange since m is initialized to 2.

public class ScalabilityTest {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    long oldTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    double[] array = new double[100000];
    int p = 2;
    int m = 2;
    for ( int i = 0; i < array.length; i++ ) {
        p += p * 12348;
        for ( int j = 0; j < i; j++ ) {
            double x = array[j] + array[i];
            m += m * 12381923;
        }
    }

    System.out.println( (System.currentTimeMillis()-oldTime) / 1000 );
    System.out.println( p + ", " + m );
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Is the number 12,381,923 significant? Or did you just button-mash it? –  templatetypedef Jun 13 '13 at 20:07
    
I just button-mashed it :) –  Jack Twain Jun 13 '13 at 20:11
    
I just asked a generalization of this question that asks about what happens if you change the start conditions: stackoverflow.com/q/17096161/501557 –  templatetypedef Jun 13 '13 at 20:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Since you are always multiplying the value of m with a number and add to m, on the 16th iteration it overflows to become 0.

In fact, since you are multiplying the number with an odd number then add it to the original, you are multiplying it with a even number, which make the trailing 0 bits moves at least one step left, thus it ends with 0:

1 1011110011101110111001000 24763848
2 1111011100110010111011000100000 2073654816
3 1111111111111101111010010000000 2147415168
4 10010100011000001100001000000000 -1805598208
5 10010010100010001100100000000000 -1836529664
6 10001011110000100010000000000000 -1950212096
7 1110010101001001000000000000000 1923383296
8 1001100000100000000000000000 159514624
9 1010011110010000000000000000000 1405616128
10 10001110001000000000000000000000 -1910505472
11 1010100100000000000000000000000 1417674752
12 1000010000000000000000000000000 1107296256
13 11001000000000000000000000000000 -939524096
14 100000000000000000000000000000 536870912
15 10000000000000000000000000000000 -2147483648
16 0 0
share|improve this answer
    
7 iterations? I got 16... –  templatetypedef Jun 13 '13 at 20:02
    
i suspect it's the overflow too, but it wouldn't go to 0, would it? it should go to -2,147,483,648 –  Russell Uhl Jun 13 '13 at 20:02
    
Yeah, that's what I found. –  templatetypedef Jun 13 '13 at 20:03
    
@templatetypedef You are right, thanks! –  Ziyao Wei Jun 13 '13 at 20:03
    
That is a beautiful explanation. Thanks for pointing that out! –  templatetypedef Jun 13 '13 at 20:08

Here's an observation: as soon as m reaches 0, executing

m += m * 12381923;

Will keep m at 0.

I wrote a program to output the values of m as it goes, and here's what I found:

2
24763848
2073654816
2147415168
-1805598208
-1836529664
-1950212096
1923383296
159514624
1405616128
-1910505472
1417674752
1107296256
-939524096
536870912
-2147483648
0
Converged after 16 iterations.

For reference, here's the source:

public class Converge {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int m = 2;
        long counter = 0; // Unnecessary, but I didn't know how many iterations we'd need!

        while (m != 0) {
            System.out.println(m);
            m += m * 12381923;
            counter++;
        }
        System.out.println(m);
        System.out.println("Converged after " + counter + " iterations.");
    }
}

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

It is because the int value overflows. The following documentation shows that the maximum value of an int is 2,147,483,647 and by the time the sixteenth iteration occurs, m is greater than this value and hence it overflows.

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2  
But even if it overflows, it should wrap back around to a negative number. That wouldn't make it 0. –  templatetypedef Jun 13 '13 at 20:07

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