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If I wish to submit a http get request using System.Net.HttpClient there seems to be no api to add parameters, is this correct?

Is there any simple api available to build the query string that doesn't involve building a name value collection and url encoding those and then finally concatenating them? I was hoping to use something like RestSharp's api (i.e AddParameter(..))

share|improve this question
    
@Michael Perrenoud you may want to reconsider using the accepted answer with characters which need encoding, see my explanation below – taras.roshko Jul 6 '15 at 13:59

10 Answers 10

up vote 121 down vote accepted

If I wish to submit a http get request using System.Net.HttpClient there seems to be no api to add parameters, is this correct?

Yes.

Is there any simple api available to build the query string that doesn't involve building a name value collection and url encoding those and then finally concatenating them?

Sure:

var query = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(string.Empty);
query["foo"] = "bar<>&-baz";
query["bar"] = "bazinga";
string queryString = query.ToString();

will give you the expected result:

foo=bar%3c%3e%26-baz&bar=bazinga

You might also find the UriBuilder class useful:

var builder = new UriBuilder("http://example.com");
builder.Port = -1;
var query = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(builder.Query);
query["foo"] = "bar<>&-baz";
query["bar"] = "bazinga";
builder.Query = query.ToString();
string url = builder.ToString();

will give you the expected result:

http://example.com/?foo=bar%3c%3e%26-baz&bar=bazinga

that you could more than safely feed to your HttpClient.GetAsync method.

share|improve this answer
4  
That's the absolute best in terms of url handling in .NET. No need to ever be manually url encoding and doing string concatenations or string builders or whatever. The UriBuilder class will even handle urls with fragments (#) for you using the Fragment property. I have seen so many people doing the mistake of manually handling urls instead of using the built-in tools. – Darin Dimitrov Jun 13 '13 at 20:30
2  
What do you mean by undocumented functionality? The ParseQueryString method returns a derived class of NameValueCollection which takes care of all the url encoding for you. The ParseQueryString seems pretty well documented. – Darin Dimitrov Jun 13 '13 at 20:35
4  
HttpUtility is in System.Web which is not available on portable runtime. It seems strange that this functionality isn't more generally available in the class libraries. – Chris Eldredge Jul 29 '13 at 22:21
14  
This solution is despicable. .Net should have proper querystring builder. – Kugel Sep 18 '13 at 3:21
2  
I assume this would not work for producing a query string with multiple values for a key (eg. foo=1&foo=2&foo=3)? Any convenient alternatives? – label17 Nov 24 '14 at 1:11

For those who do not want to include System.Web in projects that don't already use it, you can use System.Net.Http and do something like the following:

string query;
using(var content = new FormUrlEncodedContent(new KeyValuePair<string, string>[]{
    new KeyValuePair<string, string>("ham", "Glazed?"),
    new KeyValuePair<string, string>("x-men", "Wolverine + Logan"),
    new KeyValuePair<string, string>("Time", DateTime.UtcNow.ToString()),
})) {
    query = content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result;
}
share|improve this answer

TL;DR: do not use accepted version as It's completely broken in relation to handling unicode characters, and never use internal API

I've actually found weird double encoding issue with the accepted solution:

So, If you're dealing with characters which need to be encoded, accepted solution leads to double encoding:

  • query parameters are auto encoded by using NameValueCollection indexer (and this uses UrlEncodeUnicode, not regular expected UrlEncode(!))
  • Then, when you call uriBuilder.Uri it creates new Uri using constructor which does encoding one more time (normal url encoding)
  • That cannot be avoided by doing uriBuilder.ToString() (even though this returns correct Uri which IMO is at least inconsistency, maybe a bug, but that's another question) and then using HttpClient method accepting string - client still creates Uri out of your passed string like this: new Uri(uri, UriKind.RelativeOrAbsolute)

Small, but full repro:

var builder = new UriBuilder
{
    Scheme = Uri.UriSchemeHttps,
    Port = -1,
    Host = "127.0.0.1",
    Path = "app"
};

NameValueCollection query = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(builder.Query);

query["cyrillic"] = "кирилиця";

builder.Query = query.ToString();
Console.WriteLine(builder.Query); //query with cyrillic stuff UrlEncodedUnicode, and that's not what you want

var uri = builder.Uri; // creates new Uri using constructor which does encode and messes cyrillic parameter even more
Console.WriteLine(uri);

// this is still wrong:
var stringUri = builder.ToString(); // returns more 'correct' (still `UrlEncodedUnicode`, but at least once, not twice)
new HttpClient().GetStringAsync(stringUri); // this creates Uri object out of 'stringUri' so we still end up sending double encoded cyrillic text to server. Ouch!

Output:

?cyrillic=%u043a%u0438%u0440%u0438%u043b%u0438%u0446%u044f

https://127.0.0.1/app?cyrillic=%25u043a%25u0438%25u0440%25u0438%25u043b%25u0438%25u0446%25u044f

As you may see, no matter if you do uribuilder.ToString() + httpClient.GetStringAsync(string) or uriBuilder.Uri + httpClient.GetStringAsync(Uri) you end up sending double encoded parameter

Fixed example could be:

var uri = new Uri(builder.ToString(), dontEscape: true);
new HttpClient().GetStringAsync(uri);

But this uses obsolete Uri constructor

P.S on my latest .NET on Windows Server, Uri constructor with bool doc comment says "obsolete, dontEscape is always false", but actually works as expected (skips escaping)

So It looks like another bug...

And even this is plain wrong - it send UrlEncodedUnicode to server, not just UrlEncoded what server expects

Update: one more thing is, NameValueCollection actually does UrlEncodeUnicode, which is not supposed to be used anymore and is incompatible with regular url.encode/decode (see NameValueCollection to URL Query?).

So the bottom line is: never use this hack with NameValueCollection query = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(builder.Query); as it will mess your unicode query parameters. Just build query manually and assign it to UriBuilder.Query which will do necessary encoding and then get Uri using UriBuilder.Uri.

Prime example of hurting yourself by using code which is not supposed to be used like this

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this was insightful. – easuter Dec 12 '15 at 23:43
2  
Could you add a complete utility function to this answer which works? – mafu Mar 11 at 20:04
2  
I second mafu on this: I read through the answer but don't have a conclusion. Is there a definitive answer to this? – Richard Griffiths Mar 29 at 14:12
1  
I'd also like to see the definitive answer for this problem – Pones Mar 31 at 12:54

You might want to check out Flurl [disclosure: I'm the author], a fluent URL builder with optional companion lib that extends it into a full-blown REST client.

var result = await "https://api.com"
    // basic URL building:
    .AppendPathSegment("endpoint")
    .SetQueryParams(new {
        api_key = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SomeApiKey"],
        max_results = 20,
        q = "Don't worry, I'll get encoded!"
    })
    .SetQueryParams(myDictionary)
    .SetQueryParam("q", "overwrite q!")

    // extensions provided by Flurl.Http:
    .WithOAuthBearerToken("token")
    .GetJsonAsync<TResult>();

Check out the docs for more details. The full package is available on NuGet:

PM> Install-Package Flurl.Http

or just the stand-alone URL builder:

PM> Install-Package Flurl

Flurl is brand new and has plenty of room for growth and change. Feel free to submit any ideas, suggestions, or pull requests on GitHub

share|improve this answer
    
Why not extend Uri or start with your own class instead of string? – mpen Sep 4 '14 at 16:57
    
Technically I did start with my own Url class. The above is equivalent to new Url("https://api.com").AppendPathSegment... Personally I prefer the string extensions due to fewer keystrokes and standardized on them in the docs, but you can do it either way. – Todd Menier Sep 4 '14 at 20:58

Darin offered an interesting and clever solution, and here is something that may be another option:

public class ParameterCollection
{
    private Dictionary<string, string> _parms = new Dictionary<string, string>();

    public void Add(string key, string val)
    {
        if (_parms.ContainsKey(key))
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException(string.Format("The key {0} already exists.", key));
        }
        _parms.Add(key, val);
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        var server = HttpContext.Current.Server;
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (var kvp in _parms)
        {
            if (sb.Length > 0) { sb.Append("&"); }
            sb.AppendFormat("{0}={1}",
                server.UrlEncode(kvp.Key),
                server.UrlEncode(kvp.Value));
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }
}

and so when using it, you might do this:

var parms = new ParameterCollection();
parms.Add("key", "value");

var url = ...
url += "?" + parms;
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5  
You would want to encode kvp.Key and kvp.Value separately inside the for loop, not in the full query-string (thus not encoding the &, and = characters). – Matthew Jun 13 '13 at 20:27
    
@Matthew, thank you very much! I kind of just wrote this on the fly. Edited. – Mike Perrenoud Jun 13 '13 at 20:30
    
Thanks Mike. The other proposed solutions (involving NameValueCollection) didn't work for me because I'm in a PCL project, so this was a perfect alternative. For others who are working on the client side, the server.UrlEncode can be replaced with WebUtility.UrlEncode – BCA Jun 1 at 18:08

Or simply using my Uri extension

Code

public static Uri AttachParameters(this Uri uri, NameValueCollection parameters)
{
    var stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    string str = "?";
    for (int index = 0; index < parameters.Count; ++index)
    {
        stringBuilder.Append(str + parameters.AllKeys[index] + "=" + parameters[index]);
        str = "&";
    }
    return new Uri(uri + stringBuilder.ToString());
}

Usage

Uri uri = new Uri("http://www.example.com/index.php").AttachParameters(new NameValueCollection
                                                                           {
                                                                               {"Bill", "Gates"},
                                                                               {"Steve", "Jobs"}
                                                                           });

Result

http://www.example.com/index.php?Bill=Gates&Steve=Jobs

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21  
Didn't you forget URL encoding? – Kugel Sep 18 '13 at 3:23
1  
this is a great example of using extensions to create clear, useful helpers. If you combine this with the accepted answer you're on your way to building a solid RestClient – heavyhorse Feb 20 '14 at 5:43

The RFC 6570 URI Template library I'm developing is capable of performing this operation. All encoding is handled for you in accordance with that RFC. At the time of this writing, a beta release is available and the only reason it's not considered a stable 1.0 release is the documentation doesn't fully meet my expectations (see issues #17, #18, #32, #43).

You could either build a query string alone:

UriTemplate template = new UriTemplate("{?params*}");
var parameters = new Dictionary<string, string>
  {
    { "param1", "value1" },
    { "param2", "value2" },
  };
Uri relativeUri = template.BindByName(parameters);

Or you could build a complete URI:

UriTemplate template = new UriTemplate("path/to/item{?params*}");
var parameters = new Dictionary<string, string>
  {
    { "param1", "value1" },
    { "param2", "value2" },
  };
Uri baseAddress = new Uri("http://www.example.com");
Uri relativeUri = template.BindByName(baseAddress, parameters);
share|improve this answer

Since I have to reuse this few time, I came up with this class that simply help to abstract how the query string is composed.

public class UriBuilderExt
{
    private NameValueCollection collection;
    private UriBuilder builder;

    public UriBuilderExt(string uri)
    {
        builder = new UriBuilder(uri);
        collection = System.Web.HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(string.Empty);
    }

    public void AddParameter(string key, string value) {
        collection.Add(key, value);
    }

    public Uri Uri{
        get
        {
            builder.Query = collection.ToString();
            return builder.Uri;
        }
    }

}

The use will be simplify to something like this:

var builder = new UriBuilderExt("http://example.com/");
builder.AddParameter("foo", "bar<>&-baz");
builder.AddParameter("bar", "second");
var uri = builder.Uri;

that will return the uri: http://example.com/?foo=bar%3c%3e%26-baz&bar=second

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Thanks to "Darin Dimitrov", This is the extension methods.

 public static partial class Ext
{
    public static Uri GetUriWithparameters(this Uri uri,Dictionary<string,string> queryParams = null,int port = -1)
    {
        var builder = new UriBuilder(uri);
        builder.Port = port;
        if(null != queryParams && 0 < queryParams.Count)
        {
            var query = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(builder.Query);
            foreach(var item in queryParams)
            {
                query[item.Key] = item.Value;
            }
            builder.Query = query.ToString();
        }
        return builder.Uri;
    }

    public static string GetUriWithparameters(string uri,Dictionary<string,string> queryParams = null,int port = -1)
    {
        var builder = new UriBuilder(uri);
        builder.Port = port;
        if(null != queryParams && 0 < queryParams.Count)
        {
            var query = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(builder.Query);
            foreach(var item in queryParams)
            {
                query[item.Key] = item.Value;
            }
            builder.Query = query.ToString();
        }
        return builder.Uri.ToString();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I couldn't find a better solution than creating a extension method to convert a Dictionary to QueryStringFormat. The solution proposed by Waleed A.K. is good as well.

Follow my solution:

Create the extension method:

public static class DictionaryExt
{
    public static string ToQueryString<TKey, TValue>(this Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary)
    {
        return ToQueryString<TKey, TValue>(dictionary, "?");
    }

    public static string ToQueryString<TKey, TValue>(this Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, string startupDelimiter)
    {
        string result = string.Empty;
        foreach (var item in dictionary)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(result))
                result += startupDelimiter; // "?";
            else
                result += "&";

            result += string.Format("{0}={1}", item.Key, item.Value);
        }
        return result;
    }
}

And them:

var param = new Dictionary<string, string>
          {
            { "param1", "value1" },
            { "param2", "value2" },
          };
param.ToQueryString(); //By default will add (?) question mark at begining
//"?param1=value1&param2=value2"
param.ToQueryString("&"); //Will add (&)
//"&param1=value1&param2=value2"
param.ToQueryString(""); //Won't add anything
//"param1=value1&param2=value2"
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