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int (*(*q)(int (*)()))();

Ok, I start with: q is a pointer to a function, which takes... Not sure what should follow next, but perhaps it's ...a pointer to function, which takes nothing and returns int, and returns pointer to a function, which takes nothing and returns int.

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BTW you got it right. For the first try. Congrats! –  user529758 Jun 13 '13 at 21:13
1  
It also says, "if you need to pass this code to anyone, pass it to Tony", because being hurt is a lot better than being skinned alive and then killed :-) –  Shimodax Jun 13 '13 at 23:13
    
+1 for answering your own question on such a nightmare. –  Shimodax Jun 13 '13 at 23:14
    
Its good answer: Complex C declaration , will help you a lot! –  Grijesh Chauhan Jun 14 '13 at 6:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Find the lefmost identifier, then work your way out remembering that *a[] is an array of pointer, (*a)[] is a pointer to an array, *f() is a function returning a pointer, and (*f)() is a pointer to a function. Remember that in a prototype you only need to provide the type of the parameter; int f( int ); declares f as a function that takes a single int parameter; int f( int * ); declares f as a function that takes a single int pointer as a parameter. Similarly, int f( int (*)[N] ); declares f as a function that takes a pointer to an array as a parameter. Apply these rules recursively to any parameters in the function.

Thus:

        q                  -- q
       *q                  -- is a pointer to
      (*q)(         )      --   a function
      (*q)(     *   )      --     that takes a pointer to
      (*q)(    (*)())      --       a function
      (*q)(int (*)())      --       returning int
     *(*q)(int (*)())      --   returning a pointer to
    (*(*q)(int (*)()))()   --       a function  
int (*(*q)(int (*)()))();  --       returning int
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The trick is that q itself is a function pointer that returns and takes a function pointer. cdecl says:

declare q as pointer to function (pointer to function returning int) returning pointer to function returning int

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You are right.

q is a pointer point to a function passing an pointer to a function (passing nothing returning int) returning a pointer to a function (passing nothing returning int).

See here. http://c-faq.com/decl/spiral.anderson.html

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According to Precedence and associativity of Operators in the C Programming language. You can understand it in the following steps:

int (*(*q)(int (*)()))();

q->*->(int (*)())->*->()->int
   1      2        3   4   5

1:q is a pointer

2:q is a function pointer, the function it points to has a parameter int (*)(), which is also a function pointer, points to a function has no parameters and return type is int.

3:q is a function pointer, the function it pointers to has parameter int (*)(), which is also a function pointer, points to a function has no parameters and return type is int. And the function which q points to has a return type : pointer.

4:q is a function pointer, the function it pointers to has parameter int (*)(), which is also a function pointer, points to a function has no parameters and return type is int. And the function which q points to has a return type : pointer(this pointer also points to a function which has no parameter).

5:q is a function pointer, the function it pointers to has parameter int (*)(), which is also a function pointer, points to a function has no parameters and return type is int. And the function which q points to has a return type : pointer(this pointer also points to a function which has no parameter and the function's return type is int).

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