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The following is what my sample input and output data should look like. Basically, I am looking to pick the bottom 1 percentile records from several groups of columns using an apply function in R. The selection is based on minimum in a.1, b.1 and c.1 columns in my sample data respectively.

I have coded this manually for 3 separate groups but was wondering if there was an efficient way of coding by using the apply, ddply function?

I am stuck trying to write the logic. Any pointers are much appreciated.

> read.csv('in.csv')
  slno a.1 a.2 a.3 b.1 b.2 b.3 c.1 c.2 c.3
1    1  10  34  34  14   1  11   5   2  45
2    2   9  35  35  13   7  17  16   6  46
3    3  12  11  11  12   5  15  13   4  18
4    4  13  13  13  11   6  16  12   8  52
5    5  14   9   9  10   9  19  11   9  36

> read.csv('out.csv')
  a.1 a.2 a.3 b.1 b.2 b.3 c.1 c.2 c.3
1   9  35  35  10   9  19   5   2  45
2  10  34  34  11   6  16  11   9  36

sample code:

d3.a<- subset(input, a.1 < quantile(a.1, prob = 0.01),
              select=c(a.1, a.2, a.3))
d3.a<-head(arrange(d3.a,desc(a.1)), n=2)              
d3.b<- subset(input, b.1 < quantile(b.1, prob = 0.01),
              select=c(b.1, b.2, b.3))  
d3.b<-head(arrange(d3.b,desc(b.1)), n=2)                  
d3.c<- subset(input, c.1 < quantile(c.1, prob = 0.01),
              select=c(c.1, c.2, c.3))            
d3.c<-head(arrange(d3.c,desc(c.1)), n=2)
out<-cbind(d3.a,d3.b,d3.c)
share|improve this question
1  
should it not be a.1 < quantile(...) to get the bottom 1%? –  flodel Jun 13 '13 at 23:25
    
yes thank you, made the edit.. Was more looking for how to code the apply logic. I am doing both top 1%ile and bottom 1%ile in my actual dataset... –  oostopitre Jun 13 '13 at 23:27
1  
reshape your data into long form..... –  mnel Jun 14 '13 at 0:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This will give you the result as a list, and I suggest you do so because the number of rows might differ for variables a, b, c:

vars <- letters[1:3]  ## change this according to your problem.

L <- lapply(vars, function(x) {
     y <- input[, paste0(x,".1")]
     f <- y < quantile(y, prob=0.01)
     input[f, paste(x, 1:3, sep=".")]
})

If you really want a dataframe, use this:

do.call(cbind, L)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I avoided the number of rows difference issue in my full dataset by doing a head(order(),n=200). Basically extracting a constant number of rows from top\bottom from all the respective column groups. –  oostopitre Jun 14 '13 at 1:30

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