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Do web browsers coalesce the execution of css rules so that they run efficiently?

I know that multiple css rules are cascaded.

I'm only interested in the performance implications of cascaded rules.

e.g., for the following:

button,
input,
select {
  display:block;
}

select {
  margin:1rem;
}

I know that both display:block; and margin:1rem; will be applied to selects.

I'm just not sure if a browser optimizes its internal css selector checks. In the above example, sub-optimally, a browser could check for:

  1. If button, or option, or select, then display:block;
  2. If select, then margin:1rem;

The optimal way to perform these checks would be:

  1. If button, or option, then display:block;
  2. If select, then display:block; margin:1rem;

Are most modern browsers smart enough to coalesce the execution of the two rules for the select selector so that they run the second set of checks (the optimal ones)?

If so, what browsers, and which versions thereof, perform css rule coalescing?

Links to documentation about this, or to info on a browser capability listing site, would also be appreciated.

I'm interested in this because I'd like to minimize my css (which sometimes involves duplicating a selector part to avoid duplicating declarations), and to make my css more maintainable. I want to ensure, however, that my clients' browsers are not wasting cycles running redundant css selectors.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by Matt Ball, apaul34208, Paulie_D, Albzi, Andy Mar 19 '14 at 14:08

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What would be the point of the browser doing this? – Matt Ball Jun 14 '13 at 0:13
    
@matt-ball I just edited my question to clarify it. – XDR Jun 14 '13 at 1:06
    
Again, what would be the point of combining the text of unparsed/uninterpreted CSS rules? The browser has to parse the entire CSS text anyway; if it's going to optimize by combining rules, it'll happen in the internal in-memory structure that the browser uses to represent CSS rules, not the human-readable text. – Matt Ball Jun 14 '13 at 1:10
    
@matt-ball, I'm not talking about the text of the rules. Once the rules have been parsed, they must be executed as code. I'm interested in whether a browser will sub-optimally perform two if conditions that check if an element is a select, or if the browser will optimally perform only one. Both the sub-optimal and the optimal pseudo code are now included in my question as separate ordered lists. – XDR Jun 14 '13 at 1:14
    
At that point it can only be implementation-dependent, so you'll need to ask about a specific browser's CSS engine. – Matt Ball Jun 14 '13 at 2:04

Yes. This is the meaning of "cascading" in Cascading Style Sheets or CSS.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure if I got my question across properly.<br> My question is only about performance optimizations behind the scenes.<br> I know that both css declarations will be applied.<br> I'm interested in learning if the browser actually runs two selectors in the background whenever checking to determine if an element matches a css rule, or if the browser is smart enough to only check once if an element is a select, and if it is, apply both rules at once.<br> Is my question clearer now? – XDR Jun 14 '13 at 0:46
    
I just edited my question to clarify it – XDR Jun 14 '13 at 1:04
    
Your question didn't come across properly at all (no offense). I don't think it's appropriate to so drastically change what you're asking with a revision you made to the question. You should probably ask this question again making it very clear what you're concerned with. For the sake of posterity, I think you should bring back the original text of the question as I do think the original question is valid for very-new web designers. – Tom Dworzanski Jun 17 '13 at 16:07
select {
  display:block;
}

select {
  margin:1rem;
}

Will be read in order and since there is no overriding it will end up as

select {
  display:block;
  margin:1rem;
}

in the final representation. The browser has it's own default CSS which is overridden by all your CSSs in order and inside your CSS the properties are also overridden in order. If there is no over riding, then the final CSS is just a collation of all the properties across all the CSSs - hence Cascading Style Sheets.

Also, the placement of tag in the HTML page affects the cascading. If it is after the CSS links, it will be applied after the CSS files are read and vice-versa.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure if I got my question across properly. My question is only about performance optimizations behind the scenes. I know that both css declarations will be applied. I'm interested in learning if the browser actually runs two selectors in the background whenever checking to determine if an element matches a css rule, or if the browser is smart enough to only check once if an element is a select, and if it is, apply both rules at once. Is my question clearer now? – XDR Jun 14 '13 at 0:52
    
I just edited my question to clarify it – XDR Jun 14 '13 at 1:05

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