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I'm trying to create encapsulated objects that can be inherited and that possess some public properties. Here's some code:

var MyObject = (function()
{
    function myObject()
    {
        //Public variables
        this.publicVar1 = 'hello';
        this.publicVar2 = 'world';
    }

    function foo()
    {
        console.log(this.publicVar1 + ' ' + this.publicVar2);
    }

    function bar()
    {
        foo();
    }

    //Public API
    myObject.prototype = {
        constructor: myObject,
        foo: foo,
        bar: bar
    }

    return myObject;

})();

var mo = new MyObject();
mo.foo(); //hello world
mo.bar(); //undefined undefined

My question why exactly does mo.bar() log 'undefined undefined' and how can I fix this issue?

I'm trying to keep publicVar1 and publicVar2 in scope internally to the MyObject module but also make them publicly accessible and inherited by any other objects that extend the myObject prototype.

Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When bar calls foo() it is calling a function that is not a member of any object and the "this" keyword inside that function is referring to the window object.

This would work:

function bar()
{
    this.foo();
}

EDIT

Your code could be quite easy to misunderstand for someone trying to understand scope. Keep in mind that when you are calling mo.foo() and mo.bar() and this.foo() (inside the bar function) you are referring to the properties you have declared on the prototype, NOT the names of the functions you have declared inside your module. It's just a coincidence that they happen to be the same name.

The below code would illustrate it a little better:

var MyObject = (function()
{
    function myObject()
    {
        //Public variables
        this.publicVar1 = 'hello';
        this.publicVar2 = 'world';
    }

    function moduleFooFunction()
    {
        console.log(this.publicVar1 + ' ' + this.publicVar2);
    }

    function moduleBarFunction()
    {
        this.foo();
    }

    //Public API
    myObject.prototype = {
        constructor: myObject,
        foo: moduleFooFunction,
        bar: moduleBarFunction
    }

    return myObject;

})();

var mo = new MyObject();
mo.foo(); //hello world
mo.bar(); //undefined undefined
share|improve this answer
    
This definitely solved the problem, thanks. I'm still unclear as to why. Can you elaborate at all? When I call this.foo() I'm calling a function on the prototype and because publicVar1 and publicVar2 are members of that prototype's object, they are in the correct scope? Thanks again. –  adampetrie Jun 14 '13 at 0:56
    
@adampetrie the prototype is inherited by every instance and treated as if it was part of the instance (except it gets shadowed rather than overwritten if you set things on the instance). mo.foo() is doing "does mo have a foo? no. does mo.prototype have a foo? yes. Invoke foo of mo.prototype in context mo." Therefore, during this invocation, inside foo the this means mo, so doing this.bar() is like doing mo.bar(). –  Paul S. Jun 14 '13 at 1:15

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