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Im trying to create an image processing program where I only have one window with buttons and what not. I need to use MPI on the heavy processing functions, like Fourier Transform and High/Low pass.

My problem is that this window was made with QT and I havent been able to create a single window that can call another tasks to do those heavy processing functions. How can I do that?

So, just to be clear, what I want is:

A - My program is initialized once.

B - Once the user loads an image and clicks the Fourier button, the Fourier calculation will begin.

C - In the middle of Fourier calcultion, I gotta do some parallelization with MPI, where I send some parts to other processes and then gather it all up once Fourier is done.

Is this possible? What I have so far is the serial part of the code and started playing with MPI. At the first glympse I had multiple processes running multiple windows (like having 5 mspaints opened at the same time). In order to fix that, I tried this:

if ( pid == 0 )
{   
        QApplication a(argc, argv);

    MainWindow w;
        w.show();

    a.exec();
}

Which creates a single window. That Im trying to parallelize a for loop, by doing this:

    if ( pid == 0 )
    {
        printf("This is the master task. There are %d tasks in total", nProcs);

        for ( i = 1; i < nProcs; i++ )
        {
            MPI_Send( &complexPixel[i*width/nProcs][0], width*height/nProcs,  MPI_DOUBLE, i, tag, MPI_COMM_WORLD );
                MPI_Send( &H,   width*height, MPI_DOUBLE, i, tag, MPI_COMM_WORLD );
        }
    }
    else
    {
            printf("This is a slave task. PID = %d\n", pid);
            MPI_Recv( &complexPixel, width*height/nProcs, MPI_DOUBLE, 0, tag, MPI_COMM_WORLD, &statusMPI );
            MPI_Recv( &H, width*height,  MPI_DOUBLE, 0, tag, MPI_COMM_WORLD, &statusMPI );
        }
    }

    DoSomeWork();

    if ( pid != 0 )
    {
        MPI_Send( &T, width*height/nProcs, MPI_DOUBLE, 0, tag, MPI_COMM_WORLD );
        printf("Slave work finished.\n");
    }
    else
    {
        for ( i = 1; i < nProcs; i++ )
                MPI_Recv( &T[i*width/nProcs][0], width*height/nProcs, MPI_DOUBLE, i, tag, MPI_COMM_WORLD, &statusMPI );
            printf("Master work finished.\n");
    }

Right now I get stuck at the first MPI_Send, because since I ordered the master task to execute the entire window, it seems thats the only process that is able to handle it.

Thank you for your time! Hope I can get this to work!

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It's not recommended to use Qt GUI along with MPI. I advise you to put paralleled calculations in a separated executable. –  Pavel Strakhov Jun 14 '13 at 6:51
    
If you do stick with Qt and MPI I suggest you consider separating the process which deals with user interaction (via Qt) from the master process for the parallel computations (you could use groups or communicators for this). –  High Performance Mark Jun 14 '13 at 9:15
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2 Answers

What you should definitely try to do in my opinion is to completely separate the binary that shows the GUI from the binary that does the computation. I would try the following.

Create a program that implements the GUI. This program must allocate a shared memory (or create a file in a shm partition). Create a second program that implements the computation with MPI; the master process of this program must run on the same node as the GUI program and access the same shared memory (or file). The other processes wait until they get a collective communication (e.g. a MPI_Bcast or MPI_Gather) from the master process.

The master process in turn waits until the GUI program triggers a signal, which is issued as soon as the user's input has been collected and the shared buffer (or file) as been filled. At this point the master process issues the collective communication and the computation through MPI starts.

As soon as this computation ends, the master process collects the output, returns it to the GUI program using the shared memory (or file), or writes it into an output file, or whatever you must do with it and tells the GUI program that the computation is done through another signal or still using the shared memory if the GUI program is polling (which is easy to implement with Qt.

As final remarks, remember that with MPI you cannot just "parallelize the loop" as you do with OpenMP: you have to design the whole processes and the communication amonng these. And avoiding mixing the user interface (whichever it is, Qt, curses, CLI,...) and the computation allows to separate two very different tasks to the programmer and compiling them with different compiler flags (you may want e.g. to compile the computational part with -O3 and the GUI with -O2 or -Os).

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I actually tried something close to what you were describing, but got stuck into another problem where MPI cant send data that doesnt consist of the basic types (e.g: int, float, char....). While it does has a resource to bypass this, by creating a struct and telling MPI what is this struct made of, this option doesnt really help me once the data I had to send to master/slave was mainly based on std::complex. The turnaround would be serializing std::complex with boost::serialization, which I didnt have time to. –  Trmotta Jun 18 '13 at 0:23
    
A friend did advise me to load the image in question in all processes and make them only work on a part of it, then send the result to master so it can sync everything. Although this does facilitate the communication it still needs serialization. –  Trmotta Jun 18 '13 at 0:27
    
Sending an array of std::complex<T> shouldn't be a problem at all. This data type is in almost all (all relevant, anyway) C++ standard library implementations binary-compatible with the base data type T* and therefore you can pass your array by its pointer, the type MPI_(T) and double size, or normal size and type MPI_C_(T)_COMPLEX. –  Spiros Jun 18 '13 at 8:33
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I would happily use a single process for the Qt and MPI: use threads to separate user interface behaviour from the MPI and computation - so that you have a responsive user interface. It's not without challenges though.

Which thread does what?

  • There is well-documented need for all GUI work to be in the "main thread" - this isn't actually necessary for Linux but is for OS/X (previous S/O answer).
  • This conflicts with MPI - where many MPIs either don't support, or need to be compiled specially to enable, multiple threads. Read the manual page for MPI_Init_thread as this can help you determine the level of thread support.

As it happens, the most common MPI, Open MPI, has no difference between MPI_THREAD_FUNNELED and MPI_THREAD_SINGLE (previous discussion) - which means that provided you only use the non-GUI thread for MPI, you will be ok.

Libraries

If you use the same binary for every process in the application, then you will have to be sure that the library dependencies are available on the nodes of your cluster if you plan to use a cluster - not just the node (login node) where the GUI is running. In practice this may be painful: Qt brings in a lot of X dependencies unless you only use QtCore and have a non-GUI application.

Open MPI (and many other MPIs) let you use multiple different binaries - so you can run one version of your code linked with GUI things for one process (on the GUI node), and the others could be single threaded non-GUI QtCore linked applications and have fewer library dependencies.

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