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I was trying to solve a programming problem and got stuck because I couldn't understand one of the examples which goes as follows,

We guess a four digit number and the guess is "1234" . The hints given for this guess are,

  1. Each of the digits is not in it's right place (as per correct answer). That is , 1 is not in position 1, 2 is not in position 2, 3 is not in position 3 and 4 is not in position 4.

  2. The 4 digit correct answer contains the digits 1,2,3,4.

The example gave the number of possible combinations of four digit numbers based on above constraints to be 9. {2143,2341,2413,3142,3412,3421,4123,4312,4321}

I tried to approach the problem this way:

approach1 :

(Total # of combinations which is 4!) - (( Combinations which start with 1 in position 1 + Combinations with 2 in position 2 + Combinations with 3 in position 3 + Combinations with 4 in position 4)) but Couldn't get to a solution for second part of the above formula.. as Combinations which start with 1 in position 1 will be 3!- (combination which start with 2 in position 2).. and so on and I wasn't able to proceed on writing the number of combinations).

approach2:

(1 can be in 3 positions) * (2 can be in 3 or 2 positions based on where 1 is placed) * (3 can be in 1 or 2 positions based on where 2 is place)*(1 position for 4) -- Again not clear on how to find the # of positions for 2,3,4.

Please help me understand how to approach this problem

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It's a permutation not a combination. so the number of possible arrangments is 4! = 4 * 3 * 2 * 1 = 24 –  ARMBouhali Jun 14 '13 at 0:58
    
The possible arrangements (4!) will include ones which voilate hint 1 . So they have to be eliminated from the 4!. Trying to find a way to formulate elimination arrangements... –  quirkystack Jun 14 '13 at 1:03
    
I just understand it now –  ARMBouhali Jun 14 '13 at 1:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So our hint is: n1n2n3n4, use all of 1234 exactly once.

1) There are three places we can put 1 in, leaving us with _1n3n4, _n21n4 and _n2n31.

2) For each of those three places, there is one number that can go in three different places - we can either place it in another denied space (3*2) or in the first space (3*1).

3a) If we put it in another denied space, the final pair of numbers has only one orientation it can be in (6*1).

3b) If we put it in the free space, the final pair of numbers has only one orientation it can be in (3*1)

So there are 9 possibilities:

_1__
2143
4123
3142

__1_
3412
4312
2413

___1
4321
3421
2341

A second way to think of it is like this:

There are 4! = 24 possible permutations.

6 positions have 1 in position 1 (3! ways to arrange the remaining three)

4 positions have 2 in position 2 but DON'T have 1 in position 1 (3! ways to arrange the remaining three, subtract the two cases where 1 is in 1)

3 positions have 3 in position 3 but DON'T have 1 in position 1 OR 2 in position 2 (3! ways to arrange the remaining three, subtract the one case of 12, subtract the one case of 1x remaining, subtract the one case of x2 remaining)

2 positions have 4 in position 4 but DON'T have 1 in 1 OR 2 in 2 OR 3 in 3 (3! ways to arrange them, subtract 2 with 1 in the start, from the remaining subtract 2 with 2 in the middle)

24-15 = 9

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In the second way you mentioned, the last calculation has 0 positions. When we have 4 in position 4 isn't 3124 a right combination?(1 not in 1, 2 not in 2, 3 not in 3) . Can you please post how it can be 0 positions in last case? –  quirkystack Jun 14 '13 at 1:45
    
@quirkystack You're right, fixed –  Patashu Jun 14 '13 at 1:55
    
Why isn't 3142 in your list of possibilities? It doesn't violate the hint. Yet you have 4132 which does violate it since 3 is in the third position. –  Trenin Jun 16 '13 at 1:39
    
@Trenin Because I'm bad. Fixed –  Patashu Jun 16 '13 at 2:26

It doesn't matter which one is set but how many positions are set. Everytime you set a position, your choice is decremented by 1.

Now, if you're asking how to program it, then we should choose a language first.

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