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I have an <a> tag and I want to use a jQuery handler to perform an Ajax post before the browser transfers to the target link. In addition, if my Ajax post fails, I want to cancel the transfer.

This seemed like a simple task. If the post succeeds, I return true from my handler. Otherwise, I return false.

The problem is that $.post() doesn't return a value. Rather, I need to provide a callback function, which is called after the post completes and receives the results of the post. However, by this time it's too late to know what value my original handler should return.

$('#navagateAway').on('click', function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    var id = $('#event-id').val();
    $.post('@Url.Action("UpdateBeforeNavagating")', { id: myId }, afterUpdate);
}

How can my handler determine if it should return true or false when the results won't be known until my callback is called?

share|improve this question
    
A full jquery.ajax() documentation would help you a lot –  ARMBouhali Jun 14 '13 at 1:20
    
@ARMBouhali: I have access to the reference like anyone else. If you really find something there that would address my specific question, I'm sure you'll let us know. –  Jonathan Wood Jun 14 '13 at 1:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The best you can do prevent the default action then emulate it when the ajax succeeds

$('#navagateAway').on('click', function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    var id = $('#event-id').val();
    var href = this.href;
    $.post('@Url.Action("UpdateBeforeNavagating")', { id: myId }, function(){window.location = href});
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems right. I had hoped I could do this without duplicating the built-in functionality (my actual program is more complex). –  Jonathan Wood Jun 14 '13 at 1:23
    
Because the event handler is going to finish after it triggers the ajax call (not waiting for the response), this really is the only way to do it that I know of. –  norepro Jun 14 '13 at 1:56

From the jQuery API documentation

jQuery.post( url [, data ] [, success(data, textStatus, jqXHR) ] [, dataType ] )

is a shorthand Ajax function, which is equivalent to

$.ajax({
  type: "POST",
  url: url,
  data: data,
  success: success,
  dataType: dataType
});

so move your code to using $.ajax

$.ajax({
  type: "POST",
  url: '@Url.Action("UpdateBeforeNavagating")',
  data: { id: myId },
  success: afterUpdate,
  error: function_on_fail // your fn
});
share|improve this answer
    
But how does this allow me to control the return value from my original handler? I want to cancel the click on the link if it fails. I don't get how to do that from your code. –  Jonathan Wood Jun 14 '13 at 1:22
    
BTW, the shorthand $.post() also supports success and fail callbacks. So I don't really see what this adds. –  Jonathan Wood Jun 14 '13 at 1:24
    
I don't understand, you want the $.post to be blocking instead of asynchronous? Then set async: false –  Paul S. Jun 14 '13 at 1:25
    
The page you use specifies the return message. It may be text 'OK' or a page containing specific elements. Just as if you access it via the browser –  ARMBouhali Jun 14 '13 at 1:49

Use .fail() and .done() like this:

$('#navagateAway').on('click', function (e) {
    var id = $('#event-id').val();

    $.post('@Url.Action("UpdateBeforeNavagating")', { id: myId }, afterUpdate)
    .done(function(){
        alert('Success');
    })
    .fail(function(){
        e.preventDefault();
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but that doesn't address the question. My handler needs to be able to allow or cancel the original click. –  Jonathan Wood Jun 14 '13 at 1:21
    
i have updated my answer, place the e.preventDefault() on fail function to cancel the click. –  Nix R. Eyes Jun 14 '13 at 1:24
1  
I don't believe that would work as the event handler will continue to the end of the code block before the .fail callback is triggered. By then, there won't be an original event to prevent. –  norepro Jun 14 '13 at 1:54

@Url.Action("UpdateBeforeNavagating") is the submit url of your page. I guess it's in your site so it's doing particular processing at form reception.

The return value of the requested page (printed data) can be manipulated in $.ajax() with success : function

$.ajax({
  type: "POST",
  url: '@Url.Action("UpdateBeforeNavagating")',
  data: { id: myId },
  success: function(msg){ if (msg == 'somevalue') /* do somthing */ else /*do something else */}
});

'failure' field means that the page returned an error, anything other than HTTP 200 code

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help, but I don't think you understood the question. Musa's answer seemed most relevant. –  Jonathan Wood Jun 14 '13 at 14:45

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