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A partner and I are attempting to program Mergesort in Java. We have completed the algorithm, and it functions properly. However, in testing the algorithm for a variety of inputs, we noticed that it does not perform within the bound of O(Nlog(N)). We have been attempting to optimize the algorithm further and would appreciate any and all suggestions. The only requirement is that we cannot change the method headers. Our Java code is listed below:

    /**
 * MergeSort algorithm driver.
 * 
 * @param arr - input ArrayList of objects
 */
public static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> void mergesort(
        ArrayList<T> arr)
{
    // Pre-allocation of a temporary ArrayList
    // for merge space.
    ArrayList<T> temp = new ArrayList<T>(arr.size());
    temp.addAll(arr);

    // Call the recursive mergesort method.
    mergesort(arr, temp, 0, arr.size() - 1);
}

/**
 * Main mergeSort method. Makes recursive calls. 
 * 
 * @param arr - input ArrayList of objects
 * @param temp - temporary ArrayList to hold the merged result 
 * @param left - start of the subarray 
 * @param right - end of the subarray
 */
private static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> void mergesort(
        ArrayList<T> arr, ArrayList<T> temp, int left, int right)
{

    // If the size of the subcollection is less than a given threshold,
    // then perform an insertion sort rather than a mergesort.
    //if ((right - left) < threshold)
    //  insertionsort(arr, left, right);


    // If the size of the subcollection was not less than our threshold and 
    // the left end is less than the right end of subcollection, then we are 
    // done performing the sort.
    if(left < right)
    {
        int center = (left + right) / 2;
        mergesort(arr, temp, left, center);
        mergesort(arr, temp, center + 1, right);
        merge(arr, temp, left, right);
    }
}

/**
 * Internal method for merging two sorted subarrays. This is to be used with the 
 * mergesort algorithm.
 * 
 * @param arr - input ArrayList of objects
 * @param temp - temporary ArrayList in  which the result with be placed
 * @param currentLeft - start of the subarray 
 * @param rightEnd - end of the subarray
 */
private static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> void merge(
        ArrayList<T> arr, ArrayList<T> temp, int leftStart, int rightEnd)
{
    int currentLeft = leftStart;
    int leftEnd = (currentLeft + rightEnd) / 2;
    int rightStart = leftEnd + 1;


    // Main loop - compares the value in the left position
    // to the value in the right position.  
    while( currentLeft <= leftEnd &&  rightStart <= rightEnd)
    {
        // If the value in the left position is less than the right, 
        // place the left position value in the temporary collections.
        if(arr.get(currentLeft).compareTo(arr.get(rightStart)) <= 0)
        {
            temp.add(arr.get(currentLeft++));

        }


        // Otherwise, place the value in the rightStart position in
        // the temporary collection.
        else
        {
            temp.add(arr.get(rightStart++));

        }
    }

    // Copy the remaining left half.
    while( currentLeft <= leftEnd )
        temp.add(arr.get(currentLeft++));


    // Copy the remaining right half.
    while( rightStart <= rightEnd )
        temp.add(arr.get(rightStart++));


    // Loop through the temporary collection and for each element
    // currently in the collection, copy the contents back into the
    // original collection.
    for (int i = leftStart, count = 0; i <= rightEnd; i++, count++)
        arr.set(i, temp.get(count));

    // After the above operation has been completed for this particular
    // call, clear the temporary collection.
    temp.clear();

}
share|improve this question
2  
What makes you think this doesn't run in O(n log n) time? Do you have any evidence of this? – templatetypedef Jun 14 '13 at 1:21
    
We timed it multiple times with an input size starting at 20K and increasing by 20K for each data point. We then graphed the resulting time along with a graph of Nlog(N) in MS Excel, and it was clear that our data was closer to O(N^1.35), on an average of 3x bigger than Nlog(N). – codex Jun 14 '13 at 1:28
2  
@brandoko- If the runtime is O(n log n), it doesn't mean your plot should exactly match the function N * log N. It just means the function should grow at the same rate as O(n log n), meaning that if you double the input size, you should get roughly twice the runtime. Can you post your data points? – templatetypedef Jun 14 '13 at 1:29
    
@darijan Yes, that is what the algorithm is doing in the 'merge' method. The first method is a driver. The second method causes the recursive breakdown of the data structure. The third method, is the merge which does the comparison to which you are referring. – codex Jun 14 '13 at 1:30
1  
In fact, if you are getting something that's roughly 3 times n log n, but it's consistently 3 times n log n, you almost certainly have a runtime that's O(n log n) - the hidden constant factor is working out to 3. – templatetypedef Jun 14 '13 at 1:31
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Converting my comment to an answer -

To say that an algorithm has runtime O(n log n) does not mean that the runtime of the function will exactly match a plot of the function f(n) = n log n. Instead, it means that the runtime of the function grows at the same rate as the runtime of the function n log n. Therefore, for large n, if you double the size of the input, the runtime should slightly more than double.

The fact that you mentioned that your function's runtime is roughly three times the value of n log n is actually strong evidence that you have an O(n log n) runtime - your function has runtime roughly 3n log n, which means that its runtime is O(n log n), since big-O ignores constant factors. To be more mathematically accurate - the constant you have probably isn't exactly 3, since the value of n is dimensionless (it measures a quantity), while the runtime is in seconds, so there's some unit conversion going on here.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

Since @templatetypedef has convered the BigO part, let move to optimization part. I don't know Java language, but the method is self-explained. I notice that you keep add and clear you temporary list when you are merging.

temp.add(arr.get(currentLeft++));
// ...
// ...
temp.add(arr.get(rightStart++));
// ...
// ...
temp.clear();

Appending an item into an array does not take constant time.

share|improve this answer
1  
@invisal- Appending an element to an array takes amortized constant time - any individual operation might take O(n) time, but any series of n operations takes O(n) time. It might be a constant faster to not clear the list, but it's not going to make an asymptotic improvement. Additionally, many implementations of dynamic arrays keep the array around even if you clear out the elements, so it's unclear whether this is actually an optimization. It depends on how ArrayList is implemented. – templatetypedef Jun 14 '13 at 1:49
    
True, it isn't going to make asymptotic improvement, but not adding item (at least, it need to do bound check, increase length counter) and not doing the clear (decrease length counter) can slightly increase the performance. Allocate a fixed-size array and reuse is better than rely on the implementation of ArrayList. Anyway, I wholeheartedly agree with you. – invisal Jun 14 '13 at 2:00
1  
It's actually a bit messy to do that in Java, since when writing functions that use generics you have to do Cruel and Unusual Things to create an appropriately-typed array. Plus, all array accesses in Java are bounds-checked, so it might not save all that much. – templatetypedef Jun 14 '13 at 2:01

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