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So I am really confused at what I did wrong and I know I made a noobish mistake, but I really need help. If anyone could give me a hint it would be much appreciated. I'm working on some code that would calculate income for a single person, but for some reason it is only the credit that comes out.

public class TaxReturn 
{
    private double income;
    private double deductions;
    private int numberofExemptions;
    private double credits;
    private double tax;

    public TaxReturn(double salary, double deductable, int exempt,
            double creditable)
    {   
        tax = 0;
        income = salary;
        deductions = deductable;
        numberofExemptions = exempt;
        credits = creditable;
    }

    public void calculateTax()
    {
        final double exempt = 3800;
        double exemption = numberofExemptions * exempt;
        double taxableIncome = income - deductions - exemption;

        final double rate_10 = 0.1;
        final double rate_15 = 0.15;
        final double rate_25 = 0.25;
        final double rate_28 = 0.28;
        final double rate_33 = 0.33;
        final double rate_35 = 0.35;
        final double rate_395 = 0.395;

        final double income1 = 8925;
        final double income2 = 36250;
        final double income3 = 87850;
        final double income4 = 183250;
        final double income5 = 398350;
        final double income6 = 400000;

        while(taxableIncome != 0)
        {
            if(taxableIncome > income6)
            {
                tax = (taxableIncome - income6) * rate_395;
            }
            else if(taxableIncome > income5)
            {
                tax = (taxableIncome - income5) * rate_35;
            }
            else if(taxableIncome > income4)
            {
                tax = (taxableIncome - income4) * rate_33;
            }
            else if(taxableIncome > income3)
            {
                tax = (taxableIncome - income3) * rate_28;
            }
            else if(taxableIncome > income2)
            {
                tax = (taxableIncome - income2) * rate_25;
            }
            else if(taxableIncome > income1)
            {
                tax = (taxableIncome - income1) * rate_15;
            }
            else
            {
                tax = (taxableIncome) * rate_10;
            }
        }
    }

    public int printTaxReturn()
    {
        int amount = (int) ((int)Math.ceil(tax) - credits);
        return amount;
    }
}

This is what I use to test the code

    public class TaxReturnTester 
{

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {

        TaxReturn tax = new TaxReturn(80500.5, 20000.00, 3, 5000.00);


        System.out.println(tax.printTaxReturn());
    }
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Anthony Pegram, Raedwald, David Cesarino, Jim Garrison, Soner Gönül Jun 15 '13 at 7:09

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1  
how did you call the TaxReturn class ? – Raptor Jun 14 '13 at 3:20
1  
Post the invocation context as well. Also you might want to consider using BigDecimal for the calculations rather than double.. – Thihara Jun 14 '13 at 3:22
    
taxableIncome is never modified so your while never ends .. – nachokk Jun 14 '13 at 3:24
    
You should deduct each tax slab value when tax appied from taxableincome. – Ashish Patil Jun 14 '13 at 3:26
1  
I am pretty sure it shouldn't loop forever. Do you need a loop at all? – Peter Lawrey Jun 14 '13 at 3:27
up vote -2 down vote accepted

You have to call calculateTax().

You have two options:

Replace TaxReturnTester with this:

public class TaxReturnTester
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        TaxReturn tax = new TaxReturn(80500.5, 20000.00, 3, 5000.00);
        tax.calculateTax();
        System.out.println(tax.printTaxReturn());
    }
}

OR

Replace your constructor with this:

public TaxReturn(double salary, double deductable, int exempt,
            double creditable)
    {   
        tax = 0;
        income = salary;
        deductions = deductable;
        numberofExemptions = exempt;
        credits = creditable;
        calculateTax();
    }

I second the fact that you should use BigDecimal in place of floats to calculate money. You will see inconsistencies if not.

It has been recommended by Thihara to use option 1. If you don't want calculateTax() to be run every time you create the object, you definitely want to go with option 1.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks it is now calculating the tax but I still have to get it to calculate it correctly. – Jason YuChen Huang Jun 14 '13 at 4:02
    
I would create a new question with a new title describing your problem. Feel free to link it here, I will see if I can help. – Corey Horn Jun 14 '13 at 4:08
    
Thanks, but I just found out what I did wrong. I was going to respond earlier, computer crashed. – Jason YuChen Huang Jun 14 '13 at 4:29
    
Please don't use the constructor to call the method. Call it seperately. – Thihara Jun 14 '13 at 4:33
    
I add it to the printTaxRetrun Method instead because netBeans was telling me that it did not like there. Also changed my code so it is way different from what I had posted. – Jason YuChen Huang Jun 14 '13 at 5:08

Your problem basically is that you haven't called the method that does the calculations anywhere.

    public class TaxReturnTester 
    {

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {

        TaxReturn tax = new TaxReturn(80500.5, 20000.00, 3, 5000.00);


        tax.calculateTax()

        System.out.println(tax.printTaxReturn());
    }
}

I'd recommend against just calling the method from the constructor itself. It's not a very good practice.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you elaborate on why it isn't a very good practice. Not saying you are wrong, just would be a good idea. – Corey Horn Jun 14 '13 at 4:46
    
Perhaps I should have worded it to be not good design. Basic reasoning is that a constructor should not do the operations on the object itself that should be done by a client. Calling the method calculateTax should be the responsibility of the client who created and is currently using the particular object. It's fine for a small classroom project etc. But in projects with long lifetimes this kind of things are what contributes to code rot. – Thihara Jun 14 '13 at 4:51

Instead of while loop, you can use multiple if.

if(taxableIncome > income6)
{
    tax = (taxableIncome - income6) * rate_395; taxableIncome -= income6;
}
if(taxableIncome > income5)
{
    tax = (taxableIncome - income5) * rate_35; taxableIncome -= income5;
}
if(taxableIncome > income4)
{
    tax = (taxableIncome - income4) * rate_33; taxableIncome -= income4;
}
if(taxableIncome > income3)
{
    tax = (taxableIncome - income3) * rate_28; taxableIncome -= income3;
}
if(taxableIncome > income2)
{
    tax = (taxableIncome - income2) * rate_25; taxableIncome -= income2
}
if(taxableIncome > income1)
{
    tax = (taxableIncome - income1) * rate_15; taxableIncome -= income1;
}
tax = (taxableIncome) * rate_10;
share|improve this answer

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