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Is it possible to create a radio button group without the round buttons in front of each element?

The reason I would like to implement this is, that in my case the user has to choose between 3 different languages and I would really like to add this selection to a <form> tag, change the color of the selected language and make it required, but in the same time I wanted it to look something like this:

___________________________
| Username                 |     <--Text input
___________________________    
___________________________
| Password                 |     <--Text input
___________________________
____________________________   
|   EN   |   DE   |   FR   |     <--This is what I thought of... Horizontal selection
____________________________        of the language looking like a simple table with
                                    3 rows and the plain text (EN, DE, FR) in it.
____________________________
| Login                    |     <--Submit button
____________________________

I really hope that you're able to get my point :)

share|improve this question
    
+1 for the nice diagram, but do you have something you've tried already? – Kyle Jun 14 '13 at 7:36
    
thanks a lot :D At the moment I've made it with a simple table, 3 rows and plain text in it. The evaluation happens with javascript, but I'm not really happy with that because I would like to have it inside the <form> tag, post it with all the other input and add a required to it. – irie Jun 14 '13 at 7:37

Yes and no.
If you build your form with input and labels, it will do, else,
you have to. :)

the idea is :

input[type=radio] {
   position:fixed;
   left:-9999px;
}

As being fixed and of the screen, your input radio won't be in the flow anymore.
If labels are well formed and link to theme with attribute for, you just need to clikc the label to checked your invisible radio input.
To style your form, don't mind those imputs, style your labels as wished.

<input type="radio" name="r-lang" id="r1"><label for="r1"> EN </label>

Cheers

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for your answer. Could you please explain your approach with the inputs and labels a little bit more detailed? Very appreciated :) – irie Jun 14 '13 at 7:33
    
i updated answer, is it clear enough for you ? – GCyrillus Jun 14 '13 at 7:37
    
Perfect. I will give it a try and tell you how it worked out ;) – irie Jun 14 '13 at 7:42

If you put the radio buttons inside the labels and then make them invisible the user can click the label to select the radio button that is inside it. Consider the following approach.

HTML:

<div>
    <label><input type="radio"/>English</label>
    <label><input type="radio"/>French</label>
</div>

CSS:

label > input[type=radio] {
    visibility: hidden;
}

JSFiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/gEXUT/

Note that this is just an example, you'd still need to add the radio group name and perhaps the option for German etc.

share|improve this answer

I've actually written on this before, and made a jsfiddle example:

http://jsfiddle.net/Kyle_Sevenoaks/HzQBE/

I'll explain it though. (I've put the labels an radio buttons into a list for this example)

 <li class="cardtype-item">
        <input type="radio" name="preferred_color" id="red" value="Red" /> 
        <label for="red"> Red</label>
 </li>

The general idea is that you have labels linked to the radio buttons, but the radios are hidden (either by display, position, etc). Then you use CSS to style the labels exactly as you like, and because they're linked to the radio buttons (via "name" on the input and "for" on the label) you can have much more control over how they look.

li
{
    background: #333;
    color: #eee;
    padding: 10px;
    list-style-type: none;
    float: left;
    width: 100px;
}

li.selected
{
    background: #eee;
    color: #333;
    box-shadow:inset 0px 0px 15px #999;
}

input[type=radio]
{
    display: none;
}

The next part of the trick is to use Javascript (I've use jQuery) to add and remove the selected or active class on the label itself.

$('li.cardtype-item label, li.cardtype-item input').click( function() {
    $(this).parents('li').addClass('selected');
        $(this).parents().siblings('li').removeClass('selected');
});

var ident = $('input[type=radio]').attr("id");

if($('input[type=radio]').is('checked')) {
    $('form').append(ident);
};

I hope this gives you pretty much what you're after.

share|improve this answer
    
hello, i'm not too sure that a display:none on imput is a good idea. Witout js, they might be uncheckable in all or some browser. #accessibility :) – GCyrillus Jun 14 '13 at 7:58
    
It works fine in the fiddle I provided and in webpages I use it on. You could always use position and just move it off the page :) – Kyle Jun 14 '13 at 7:59
    
peronnaly, i would go for the position option :) , but you're right , it works so – GCyrillus Jun 14 '13 at 8:07

try this

radio button html

 <div class="buttonSlider">
<input type="radio" value=".." name="radio1" />
<input type="radio" value=".." name="radio1" />
<input type="radio" value=".." name="radio1" />
</div>

javascript

            $(document).ready(function () {
            $('.buttonSlider input').replaceWith('<div class="radiobox"> <input type="radio" name="radio1" value=".."/></div>');
            $('.buttonSlider input').prop('checked', false);
            $('.radiobox').click(function () {
                var this_div = $(this);
                if (this_div.find('input').is(':checked')) {
                    this_div.find('input').prop('checked', false);
                    this_div.css({ 'background-color': '#800001' });
                }
                else {
                    this_div.find('input').prop('checked', true);
                    this_div.css({ 'background-color': '#808080' });
                }

            })
        })

css

.buttonSlider 
            {
            background-color: #800001;
            }
            .buttonSlider .radiobox
            {
                height: 20px;
                width: 100px;
                border: 1px solid black;
                background-color: #800001;
                float: left;
            }
            .buttonSlider input
            {
                display: none;
            }
share|improve this answer
up vote -1 down vote accepted

Thanks to the help of everyone of you (and this awesome answer). I could finally implement it in my website.

This is my code:

HTML:

<div id="language">
       <table id="languagetable" border="0px" cellspacing="0px">
              <tr>
                     <td width="33.33333%">
                             <input type="radio" id="fr" name="languageselection" value="en">
                             <label for="en">FR</label>
                      </td>
                      <td width="33.33333%">
                             <input type="radio" id="en" name="languageselection" value="de" checked>
                             <label for="de">EN</label>
                      </td>
                      <td width="33.33333%">
                             <input type="radio" id="it" name="languageselection" value="it">
                             <label for="de">DE</label>
                      </td>
              </tr>
       </table>
</div>

CSS:

#languagetable input[type="radio"] {
    display:none; 
}

#languagetable label {
    display:inline-block;
    margin: 0 auto;
    font-family: Arial;
    font-size: 20px;
}

#languagetable input[type="radio"]:checked + label { 
    color: #99CC00;
}
share|improve this answer

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