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Does std::make_shared<POD>() value initialize my POD?

If yes, is this a guaranteed by the standard?

If no (as I suspect), is there a way to do this? I guess std::make_shared<POD>(POD()) would do but is that what I should be doing?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Yes, it's value intialized, and this is guaranteed by the standard:

§20.7.2.2.6,2: (about make_shared)

Effects: Allocates memory suitable for an object of type T and constructs an object in that memory via the placement new expression ::new (pv) T(std::forward<Args>(args)...).

And §5.3.4,15:

A new-expression that creates an object of type T initializes that object as follows:
— If the new-initializer is omitted, the object is default-initialized (8.5); if no initialization is performed, the object has indeterminate value.
Otherwise, the new-initializer is interpreted according to the initialization rules of 8.5 for directinitialization.

So it's direct-initialized as in new POD().

§8.5,16:

The semantics of initializers are as follows. [...]
— If the initializer is (), the object is value-initialized.

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Does std::make_shared<POD>() value initialize my POD?

Yes.

If yes, is this a guaranteed by the standard?

C++11 20.7.2.2.6/2 specifies that it "constructs an object in that memory via the placement new expression ::new (pv) T(std::forward<Args>(args)...)". With no arguments, that will be ::new (pv) T(), which value-initialises the object.

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Does std::make_shared<POD>() value initialize my POD?

Yes, it does. Paragraph 20.7.2.2.6/2 about std::make_shared<>() says that:

2 Effects: Allocates memory suitable for an object of type T and constructs an object in that memory via the placement new expression ::new (pv) T(std::forward<Args>(args)...).

In case no arguments are passed, this means your data structure is constructed this way:

::new(pv) T()

This is guaranteed to yield direct-initialization because of paragraph 5.3.4/15:

A new-expression that creates an object of type T initializes that object as follows:

— If the new-initializer is omitted, the object is default-initialized (8.5); if no initialization is performed, the object has indeterminate value.

Otherwise, the new-initializer is interpreted according to the initialization rules of 8.5 for direct-initialization.

In your case, the new-initializer is present and it is (). And direct-initialization with an empty set of parentheses is specified to yield value-initialization in paragraph 8.5/11:

An object whose initializer is an empty set of parentheses, i.e., (), shall be value-initialized. [...]

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