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Let's say I have a file with the following contents:

VSDmaMapInfo
VSDmaMapInfo::
VSDmaMapInfo;
VSPortErr
VSPortErr,
VSPortErr::

and after sorting I wanted the output to be

VSDmaMapInfo
VSPortErr

Is there any way to do it using either grep, awk, uniq,or any other tools etc

Thanks a lot for your help.

share|improve this question
    
Strip punctuation, then get the unique lines? Oh, and what is it with the inconsistent uppercasing of Vs? Is that relevant? –  amon Jun 14 '13 at 8:31
    
Yes. That would do. Yeah my typo. It is always VS.. –  Marc Spencer Jun 14 '13 at 8:35

7 Answers 7

$ awk -F'[[:punct:]]' '{print $1}' file | sort -u
VSDmaMapInfo
VSPortErr
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1  
+1 Nicely done! –  jaypal singh Jun 14 '13 at 13:10

Code for sorted content with GNU sed

sed -r '$!N;/(\w+)\W*\n\1\W*/!{s/(\w+).*/\1/;P};D' file
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Skips duplicate lines,

perl -nE 's|\W||g; say unless $h{$_}++' file
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. It really helps. –  Marc Spencer Jun 14 '13 at 8:54

This can work:

$ tr -d "[[:punct:]]" < file | sort -u
VSDmaMapInfo
VSPortErr

Explanation

tr -d "[[:punct:]]"            < file         |    sort -u
   remove puntuation chars     read file          get unique

Update

From your comment:

I just had an observation: If the input containts VSDmaMapInfo::callMe it is removing the punctuation but joining the next word like VSDmaMapInfocallMe. Is it possible that I have the output as VSDmapMapInfo only without the next word getting appended.

We can do the following:

$ cat file
VSDmaMapInfo
VSDmaMapInfo::
VSDmaMapInfo;
VSDmaMapInfo;asdfs
VSPortErr
VSPortErr,
VSPortErr::

$ awk -F"[,:;]" '{print $1}' file | sort -u
VSDmaMapInfo
VSPortErr

That is, make awk print the first word before any ,, : or ;. Then, sort it with -u parameter to have unique data.

share|improve this answer
    
Updated my answer. It previously had different cases for each name, so I included a pipe to put everything in lower case. –  fedorqui Jun 14 '13 at 8:40
    
Thanks a lot.. It works. I just had an observation: If the input containts VSDmaMapInfo::callMe it is removing the punctuation but joining the next word like VSDmaMapInfocallMe. Is it possible that I have the output as VSDmapMapInfo only without the next word getting appended. –  Marc Spencer Jun 14 '13 at 8:51
    
Sure! See my updated answer taking this into consideration. –  fedorqui Jun 14 '13 at 8:55
    
Thank you soo much @fedorqui. It worked great.. –  Marc Spencer Jun 14 '13 at 9:02

Assuming that the deduplication is to happen case-insensitive, the following Perl-oneliner emits the wanted output:

perl -ne's/[[:punct:]]+$//;$h{lc $_}++ or print'

Test:

$ perl -ne's/[[:punct:]]+$//;$h{lc $_}++ or print' <<'END'
VSDmaMapInfo
VSDmaMapInfo::
VsDmaMapInfo;
VSPortErr
VsPortErr,
VsPortErr::
END

Output:

VSDmaMapInfo
VSPortErr

Edit:

For case-sensitive matching change $h{lc $_}++ to $h{$_}++.

Edit2:

To remove anything after the first punctuation character on the line, replace the substitution by s/[[:punct:]].*//.

To call the one-liner with a file, you can list the input file(s) as command line arguments:

$ perl -ne'...' the-file.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot..It is really helpful. Let's say I have a big file as the input how do i pass it your script. –  Marc Spencer Jun 14 '13 at 8:50
    
@MarcSpencer You can pass a file as first command line argument, instead of the <<'END' here-doc: perl -ne'...' the-file.txt. You can also pipe the contents into the script, like perl -ne'...' < the-file.txt –  amon Jun 14 '13 at 8:57
    
Thanks a lot! That worked.. –  Marc Spencer Jun 14 '13 at 9:02

sed solution ( basically sed + sort)

sed 's/[^[:alpha:]]//g' <file> |sort -u

another clumsy awk solution

awk '{gsub(/[^[:alpha:]]/,""); a[$0]=1} END{for(var in a) print var}' <file>

another awesome pure bash solution (I love to play around with bash :))

l=""
while read r
do
r=${r//[^[:alpha:]]/}
 if ! [[ $l =~ $r ]]
 then
 echo $r
 l="$l $r"
 fi
done < <file>
share|improve this answer

If you use GNU awk, you can use multiple characters as record separator (RS), so you can do this:

awk '!a[$0]++' RS='[[:punct:]]*\n' test.txt

Explanation:

  1. By setting the record separator (RS) to this regex, we get rid of the trailing punctuations, so the record i.e. $0 is a word.
  2. We keep count of the words in a.
    • If the word is not a duplicate, a[$0] is 0, and !a[$0] evaluates to true, so the word gets printed out. Otherwise, it doesn't get printed out.
share|improve this answer
    
You should mention that this is GNU awk only. –  Ed Morton Jun 14 '13 at 10:48
    
@EdMorton, which part of it? The [[::punc::]]? –  doubleDown Jun 14 '13 at 10:49
1  
Setting RS to multiple characters. In POSIX and most other non-GNU awks the RS can only be a single character and all additional characters get ignored so what you specified above would actually set RS to the single character [. –  Ed Morton Jun 14 '13 at 10:51
1  
@EdMorton, oh right. Updating my post. Thanks. –  doubleDown Jun 14 '13 at 11:22

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