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If you bind a scroll event on an element which makes use of scrollbars depending on the content's length, it seems that the scroll event is being fired if you partly scroll down before updating the element with new content which doesn't require scrollbars.

It's a bit hard to explain so I put together the following example:

var searchList = $('#search-list');
searchList.on('scroll', function() {
     console.log('scrollHandler...');   
});

$('#reload').on('click', function() {
    console.log('reloadSearchList...');

    searchList.html('Updated content.');
});

http://jsfiddle.net/ttL8W/

Please follow these steps to reproduce the "strange" behaviour:

Test 1 (behaves normal, like expected):

  • Don't touch the scroll bar and just click on the "reload button". Only the handler for the reload button will get triggered.

Test 2 (behaves strange because scroll event is triggered):

  • Scroll down the list a little bit.
  • Click on the "reload button".

Is this working as intended or is it a bug?

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Working as expected –  Jérôme Jun 14 '13 at 8:37
    
It seems the scroll event fires again when the scroll bar disappears. if for example you append more li and the scroll bar is still there, the event won't fire. –  Spokey Jun 14 '13 at 8:39
    
I guess one way to avoid it is to remove the scroll event before manipulating the element and rebind the event afterwards. –  Bay Jun 14 '13 at 8:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This happens because the browser tries to maintain the scrollTop offset of the div.

If you replace the content with a shorter text (content < parent and maximum scrollTop offset = 0) - the scroll event will occur as the browser has to scroll back to 0.

Depending on the desired result - you can either ignore it (and maintain the scrollOffset) or reset it yourself before replacing the content, e.g.:

$('#reload').on('click', function() {
    searchList.prop('scrollTop', 0);

    console.log('reloadSearchList...');
    searchList.html('Updated content.');
});

This will still call the onScroll event but the behaviour will be consistent. If you don't want the onScroll event listener to occur - you can disable it or parameterize the handler (to not execute when called manually).

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