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For example, I have a set of the strings:

"Abc zcf",
"Abcd zcf",
"Zcf Abc",
"Zcf Abcd",
"Test ez",
"Rabc Jabc"

How to find in this set strings which any word begin at "abc" characters? In my example it would be strings

"Abc zcf",
"Zcf Abc",
"Abcd zcf",
"Zcf Abcd"
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2  
What have you tried ? –  X.L.Ant Jun 14 '13 at 11:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to match anything, followed by a word boundary, followed by abc. You also want to do this in a case-insensitive way. The pattern

(?i).*\\babc.*

Will work. A quick example

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    final Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("(?i).*\\babc.*");

    final String[] in = {
        "Abc zcf",
        "Abcd zcf",
        "Zcf Abc",
        "Zcf Abcd",
        "Test ez",
        "Rabc Jabc"};

    for (final String s : in) {
        final Matcher m = pattern.matcher(s);
        if (m.matches()) {
            System.out.println(s);
        }
    }
}

Output:

Abc zcf
Abcd zcf
Zcf Abc
Zcf Abcd

EDIT

Further to @fge's comments about matching the whole pattern here is a neater way of searching for the pattern in the String.

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    final Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("(?i)(?<=\\b)abc");

    final String[] in = {
        "Abc zcf",
        "Abcd zcf",
        "Zcf Abc",
        "Zcf Abcd",
        "Test ez",
        "Rabc Jabc"};

    for (final String s : in) {
        final Matcher m = pattern.matcher(s);
        if (m.find()) {
            System.out.println(s);
        }
    }
}

This says find abc that is preceded by \b - i.e. the word boundary. The output is the same.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem here is that you try and match the whole input. And in this case this is not needed. –  fge Jun 14 '13 at 12:09
    
@fge I think this problem is defined in a way that it makes more sense to try and match the whole input. Obviously you could drop the .* and use find() but I think it's clearer if you define a pattern that matches the whole input. –  Boris the Spider Jun 14 '13 at 12:14
    
Well, I personally disagree. Matching the whole input is losing 90+% of regular expressions' power... This is why regexes in XML suck. –  fge Jun 14 '13 at 12:19
    
You don't need to put the word boundary into a lookbehind assertion.\\b at the required position is just fine. –  stema Jun 14 '13 at 12:37

You have to use a Pattern:

final Pattern p = Pattern.compile("\\bAbc");

// ...

if (p.matcher(input).find())
    // match

FYI, \b is the word anchor. Java's definition for a word character is the underscore, a digit or a letter.

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1  
You should probably note that Java defines a word as anything consisting of letters, digits and underscores. –  Martin Büttner Jun 14 '13 at 12:05
    
@m.buettner good point, edited the answer –  fge Jun 14 '13 at 12:07

You can use:

if( maChaine.startWith("Abc") ) 
{ 

    list.add( maChaine ) ; 
}
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|| maChaine.contains(" Abc"). –  Joop Eggen Jun 14 '13 at 12:04

Try this regex for your problem:

(^Abc| Abc)
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