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I have dict object something similar to like this,

topo = {
'name' : 'm0',
'children' : [{
    'name' : 'm1',
    'children' : []
 }, {
    'name' : 'm2',
    'children' : []
 }, {
    'name' : 'm3',
    'children' : []
 }]
}

Now, i want to insert one more dict object let's say,

{
'name' : 'ABC',
'children' : []
}

as child of dict named "m2" inside m2's children array.

Could you please suggest how should i go about it?

Should i go for a separate data structure implementation ?

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closed as too localized by Marcin, Achrome, Cairnarvon, Stony, Jaguar Jun 16 '13 at 18:33

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1  
what is the problem? –  Zagorulkin Dmitry Jun 14 '13 at 12:00
1  
If You want to addres to iten not by index but by name use dict or OrderedDict instead of list for children –  oleg Jun 14 '13 at 12:22
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would suggest you first convert it to a data structure like this:

topo = {
  'm0' : {
    'm1' : {},
    'm2' : {},
    'm3' : {},
  },
}

That is, you have made every value for the 'name' key be a key in a dictionary, and every value for the 'children' key be the value for that key, and changed it to a dictionary instead of a list.

Now you don't need to assume beforehand the index position where m2 is found. You do need to know that m2 is inside m0, but then you can simply say

topo['m0']['m2']['ABC'] = {}

You can convert between formats with this code:

def verbose_to_compact(verbose):
    return { item['name']: verbose_to_compact(item['children']) for item in verbose }

def compact_to_verbose(compact):
    return [{'name':key, 'children':compact_to_verbose(value)} for key, value in compact]

Call them like this

compact_topo = verbose_to_compact([topo]) # function expects list; make one-item list
verbose_topo = compact_to_verbose(compact_topo)[0] # function returns list; extract the single item

I am assuming the format you have is the direct interpretation of some file format. You can read it in that way, convert it, work with it in the compact format, and then just convert it back when you need to write it out to a file again.

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'compact_to_verbose' is not working as per the requirement. –  Aashish P Jun 17 '13 at 5:05
    
What is the problem? –  morningstar Jun 17 '13 at 5:14
    
ValueError: need more than 1 value to unpack –  Aashish P Jun 17 '13 at 5:19
    
You have passed the wrong kind of value to it. The input to compact_to_verbose should be a dictionary. The compact representation is a dictionary. If type(compact) == type({}) you won't get that error. –  morningstar Jun 17 '13 at 5:22
    
Ok.got it. Actually the thing is, my dict is coming put to be, {'MDP': {'children': {'MDP.1': {'children': {}, 'computed': True, 'meter_id': None, 'name': 'MDP.1'}, 'MDP.2': {'children': {}, 'computed': True, 'meter_d': None, 'name': 'MDP.2'}}, 'computed': True, 'meter_id': None, 'name': 'MDP'}} That's why it is causing an error. –  Aashish P Jun 17 '13 at 5:33
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Your issue is a common Tree structure, you can consider to use http://pythonhosted.org/ete2/tutorial/tutorial_trees.html and populate each node with your dict value (don't reinvent the wheel).

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You can use pythonhosted.org/ete2/tutorial/… for the structure of your tree and use a dict to map the name with its value. –  said omar Jun 14 '13 at 12:25
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topo['children'][1]['children'].append({'name': 'ABC', 'children': []})

This adds the new dictionary under the children of the second child of topo:

{'children': [{'children': [], 'name': 'm1'},
              {'children': [{'children': [], 'name': 'ABC'}], 'name': 'm2'},
              {'children': [], 'name': 'm2'}],
 'name': 'm0'}

But I would not use dict and list builtin objects for such a task - I'd rather create my own objects.

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Thanks for your suggestion. –  Aashish P Jun 14 '13 at 12:10
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Add it in the dictionary as you normally would, with the use of .append():

topo['children'][1]['children'].append({'name' : 'ABC', 'children' : []})

topo is now:

{
  "name": "m0", 
  "children": [
    {
      "name": "m1", 
      "children": []
    }, 
    {
      "name": "m2", 
      "children": [
        {
          "name": "ABC", 
          "children": []
        }
      ]
    }, 
    {
      "name": "m3", 
      "children": []
    }
  ]
}
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topo['children'].append({'name' : 'ABC',
                      'children' : []
                     })
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