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I need to recreate a provider in my web.config file that looks something like this:

<membership defaultProvider="AspNetSqlMemProvider">
    		<providers>
                <clear/>
    			<add connectionStringName="TRAQDBConnectionString" applicationName="TRAQ" minRequiredPasswordLength="7" minRequiredNonalphanumericCharacters="0" name="AspNetSqlMemProvider" type="System.Web.Security.SqlMembershipProvider, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=B03F5F7F11D50A3A"/>
    		</providers>
    	</membership>

However, I get a runtime error saying this assembly cannot be loaded, and I think it is because I have the wrong PublicKeyToken. How do I look up the PublicKeyToken for my assembly?

Alternatively, am I going entirely the wrong way with this?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Using sn.exe utility:

sn -T YourAssembly.dll

or loading the assembly in Reflector.

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4  
sn.exe can typically be found at one of the following locations under C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows: C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A\Bin, C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A\Bin\x64, C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v8.0A\bin\NETFX 4.0 Tools –  david.barkhuizen Nov 4 '13 at 10:00

sn -T <assembly> in Visual Studio command line. If an assembly is installed in the global assembly cache, it's easier to go to C:\Windows\assembly and find it in the list of GAC assemblies.

On your specific case, you might be mixing type full name with assembly reference, you might want to take a look at MSDN.

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Answer is very simple use the .NET Framework tools sn.exe. So open the Visual Studio 2008 Command Prompt and then point to the dll’s folder you want to get the public key,

Use the following command,

sn –T myDLL.dll

This will give you the public key token. Remember one thing this only works if the assembly has to be strongly signed.

Example

C:\WINNT\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v3.5>sn -T EdmGen.exe

Microsoft (R) .NET Framework Strong Name Utility  Version 3.5.21022.8
Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

Public key token is b77a5c561934e089
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Using PowerShell, you can execute this statement:

([system.reflection.assembly]::loadfile("c:\MyDLL.dll")).FullName

The output will provide the Version, Culture and PublicKeyToken as shown below:

MyDLL, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=669e0ddf0bb1aa2a

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Thanks! your method is the only one that worked for me sn -T dllname.dll would only show help text when I ran it –  Vdex Sep 24 at 8:52

You can also check by following method.

Go to Run : type the path of DLL for which you need public key. You will find 2 files : 1. __AssemblyInfo_.ini 2. DLL file

Open this __AssemblyInfo_.ini file in notepad , here you can see Public Key Token.

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Just adding more info, I wasn't able to find sn.exe utility in the mentioned locations, in my case it was in C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A\bin

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If you open up a visual studio command prompt it should be on your path. –  Nattrass Oct 20 at 7:01

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