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Is there a list of reserved words for Neo4j Cypher? I'd like to avoid any pitfalls others have discovered, reserved words have bitten me in the past with other projects.

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2 Answers 2

The only truly reserved words (as of 2.0 M03) are (and, sorry if this is incomplete, this is off the top of my head):

START
MATCH
WHERE
WITH
RETURN
FOREACH
CREATE
SET
UNION
DELETE
REMOVE   
CASE
WHEN
THEN
ASC
DESC

There are functions/aggregation functions as well, but the parser is smart enough to be able to allow things like:

RETURN count(*) as count

I wouldn't worry about it--it will give you a reasonable error if you hit one of these cases anyway. Like so:

Query:
START match=node(*) 
RETURN match
Error: reserved keyword
"START match=node(*) "
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There's no comprehensive list of reserved words in the documentation. For the upcoming version 2.0, the keywords are defined in a single file, with possible abbreviations (like asc/desc):

https://github.com/neo4j/neo4j/blob/2.0/community/cypher/src/main/scala/org/neo4j/cypher/internal/parser/v2_0/Strings.scala

Version 1.9 is a bit less well organized, most are in https://github.com/neo4j/neo4j/blob/2.0/community/cypher/src/main/scala/org/neo4j/cypher/internal/parser/v1_9/Base.scala, "create unique" is in https://github.com/neo4j/neo4j/blob/2.0/community/cypher/src/main/scala/org/neo4j/cypher/internal/parser/v1_9/CreateUnique.scala

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Good point. Your 2.0 list is more comprehensive than mine. "unique" is not actually reserved, although "create" is. –  Wes Freeman Jun 15 '13 at 17:33
    
BTW, the parser is probably changing soon, so it may not have the same keyword requirements. Check out the "experimental parser" branch. –  Wes Freeman Jun 15 '13 at 17:34

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