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If you could go back in time and tell yourself to read a specific book at the beginning of your career as a developer, which book would it be?

I expect this list to be varied and to cover a wide range of things.

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inquestion:this "Code Complete"
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One of the most important question ever asked on stackoverflow :) –  SRO Jun 9 '09 at 19:30
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Browsing this thread make me realize how ugly most programming related books are. Very good thread though! –  Carl Bergquist Aug 5 '09 at 12:09
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Interesting this is, while the title reads "What is the single most influential book every programmer should read?", there are quite a few books suggested that deal with language specific topics. By definition, and by question as it was put, the books suggested here should deal with language agnostic topics, which proves most programmers have yet to learn how to read. –  ldigas Oct 2 '09 at 19:54
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If I could go back in time and tell myself to read something, it better be a newspaper or sports fact book that I carried with me. Anything else is a waste of good time travel. :-) –  jmucchiello Nov 8 '09 at 9:38
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You know, if I wasn't worried about getting down voted a WHOLE lot I would trollishly go and suggest Twilight. "Its ALSO about people who are pale and avoid the sun!" –  Jacob Bellamy Feb 12 '10 at 0:20

214 Answers 214

In addition to other people's suggestions, I'd recommend either acquiring a copy of SICP, or reading it online. It's one of the few books that I've read that I feel greatly increased my skill in designing software, particularly in creating good abstraction layers.

A book that is not directly related to programming, but is also a good read for programmers (IMO) is Concrete Mathematics. Most, if not all of the topics in it are useful for programmers to know about, and it does a better job of explaining things than any other math book I've read to date.

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Not a programming book, but still a very important book every programmer should read:

Orbiting the Giant Hairball by Gordon MacKenzie

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The Interpretation of Object-Oriented Programming Languages by Ian Craig

Because it showed me how much more there was to OO than standard C++/Java idioms

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Thinking in Java (Patterns) , Bruce Eckel

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Professional Excel Development This book showed how to make high quality applications within one of the most ubiquitous programming platforms available.

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PHP objects, patterns and practice. http://www.apress.com/book/view/9781590599099

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'How to be a Programmer: A Short, Comprehensive, and Personal Summary' by Robert L Read

Not exactly a book but an essay, but this one was definitely an inspiration for me when I got into coding. Loved the notion of entering a tribe. Worth a read.

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A collection it was, and stunning. Edsger Dijkstra's (with some help from C.A.R. Hoare) little black book Structured Programming and particlarly the essay titled "On Our Inability To Do Much".

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The C++ Series of programming books by Deitel and Deitel

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Managing Gigabytes is an instant classic for thinking about the heavy lifting of information.

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C# for Experienced Programmers

or really anything from Dietel & Dietel. I have read several of their books, and everything has been awesome.

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Years ago, Bruce Eckel's Thinking in C++ taught me a great deal about C++ but also the importance of isolating an issue to a small 'sandbox' for study/analysis. This technique has greatly impacted my career and routinely helps me troubleshoot problems both for myself and others.

These days, I refer to Thinking in Java, which is written in the same style. Somehow, the style is beyond mere, simple 'examples' and profoundly gets at the heart of the issue.

I am so grateful that I will buy virtually anything by Eckel, sight unseen.

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When I first started, there was "Mastering Turbo Pascal" by Tom Swan. There is nothing terribly profound about this book. It was clear and concise with usable examples. Based on this knowledge, I spawned a software development career now 15+ years in.

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C++ BlackBook. KISS all the way through

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Mastering C++ from Tom Swan. It was the best kind of book, it had examples which were simple enough to teach concepts but useful enough to solve other problems. It was very readable, it was the first book I read when got to college, and it only needed to be read once.

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Tenenbaum's first operating systems book. My first look at kernal level programming.

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"Algorithms in C" (1st edition) by Sedgewick taught me all about algorithms as well as teaching me all about the pitfalls of documentation and copy/pasting code as all the example code in this version was taken from the "Algorithms in Pascal" version and were simply passed through a simple code translator which did not adjust for the different indexing schemes.

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My all-time favorite was the C# Back Book, by Matthew Telles.

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Dreaming in Code Has probably had the most profound impact in the last 6 months.

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"The C++ Programming Language" by Bjarne Stroustrup

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Actually, two books stand out. The first was Code Complete. Despite its age, this is still a very useful book, and the chapter on the dangers of premature optimisation is worth the price of the book on its own.

The second one was The Psychology of Everyday Things (now called The Design of Everyday Things, I think), which changed the way I think about user interfaces when designing applications. It made me more user-focused.

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"Writing Solid Code: Microsoft's Techniques for Developing Bug-Free C Programs (Microsoft Programming Series)" by Steve MacGuire.

Interesting what a large proportion the books mentioned here are C/C++ books.

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For me "Memory as a programming concept in C and C++" really opened my eyes to how memory management really works. If you're a C or C++ developer I consider it a must read. You will defiantly learn something or remember things you might have forgotten along the way.

http://www.amazon.com/Memory-Programming-Concept-C/dp/0521520436

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SAP ABAP programming? "Teach Yourself ABAP in 21 Days" is the best book!

It contains no clever tricks or wizardry, but after 3 years, I never came upon a more comprehensive book

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Schaum's Outline of Programming with C++ by John R Hubbard.

This was the first programming book I read, when I started out with C++. It was gifted to me by someone who saw my interest in programming. The book is very good for beginners - it started from the elementary concepts, went up to templates and vectors. The examples given were pretty relevant. The book made you ponder and ask more questions, and try out things for yourself.

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How to Solve it by computer - R.G.Dromey

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Probably "C for Dummies" vol 1, back in 1997 or so. Just an introduction really, but it was a good read after having picked up the taste for programming in GFA Basic on the Atari ST. The Coronado C tutorial around the same time helped too.

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Michael Abrash The Zen of Assembly Language

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Applying UML and Design Patterns.

It helped design patterns to click with me, and provided a justification for UML that made sense to me in the phrasing 'UML as Sketch'. Namely that UML should be used as a brief sketch of the system that has the additional benefit of you not having to explain the notation to others (they either already know UML or you give them a UML book to read)

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