Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a .txt file like below:

9342432_A1 9342432 1 0 0 0
4392483_A2 4392483 2 0 0 0 
4324321_A3 4324321 1 0 0 0
9342432    9342432 2 0 0 0

For example, I want to generate a subset with the IDs 4324321_A3 and 9342432 (based on the first column!). I tried the following command to find the exact matches:

 grep -E '4324321_A3|9342432'

But when I use this line, I end up with a dataset like this:

9342432_A1 9342432 1 0 0 0
4324321_A3 4324321 1 0 0 0
9342432    9342432 2 0 0 0

The problem is that the line that matches a part of the ID (9342432_A1) shouldn't be there. Can anyone help me with this?

I would like to end up with this:

4324321_A3 4324321 1 0 0 0
9342432    9342432 2 0 0 0

Thank you! Regards Lisanne

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It matches

9342432_A1 9342432 1 0 0 0

because it has 9342432 in the second column.

You need to update the command to make grep check lines starting with those words, that is, use ^word:

$ grep -E '^4324321_A3|^9342432' file
4324321_A3 4324321 1 0 0 0
9342432    9342432 2 0 0 0

To make it more accurate, you can also use -w that matches the full word. This way grep -wE '^4324321_A3|^9342432' file would not match a line like

4324321_A3something 4324321 1 0 0 0
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for -w ... –  devnull Jun 14 '13 at 14:03

Your regex doesn't check if the ID is at the start of the line. Simply include a ^ at the beginning of your regular expression to tell it to match only ID's at the start of the line, and then group the alternatives using ():

grep -E '^(4324321_A3|9342432)\b' <file>

\b is a boundary character which forces it to only match whole words.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, "best" answer –  Endoro Jun 15 '13 at 5:12

Include in your grep the ^ at the beginning and after the pattern the space .

share|improve this answer

Add a start of line anchor at the beginning and a word boundary at the end of each pattern

grep -E '^4324321_A3\b|^9342432\b'
share|improve this answer

When you need matching on a specific field (or column) of your files, it could be better to use a tool like awk instead of grep. you can write something like this:

awk '$1 == "STRING_TO_MATCH"' txtfile.txt

and this could work also on a column different from the first (just use $2 for second column, $3 for the third, and so on).
awk accept regex as well as grep.

Regards.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.