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I'm using Monitor class to manage critical sections. But sometimes I encounter the SynchronizationLockException with the following message

An unhandled exception of type 'System.Threading.SynchronizationLockException' occurred in ManagedType.dll
Additional information: Object synchronization method was called from an unsynchronized block of code.

My code is below

Object^ lockObj = gcnew Object(); //Global variable
bool GetValue()
{
    try
    {
        Monitor::Enter(lockObj);
        return this.value;
    }
    finally
    {
        Monitor::Exit(lockObj);
    }
}

The SynchronizationLockException thrown when Monitor::Exit(lockObj) called.

I have searched on this forum and on internet, but most of topics inclusive MSDN said that "this exception will be thrown when you try to using value type variable instead of reference types in Monitor.Enter() and Monitor.Exit()".

But in my case, I use lockObj that is reference object. So I don't know why it can throw this exception. Someone can help me?

Many Thanks,

T&TGroup!

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1  
Since Monitor::Enter can throw other exceptions, have you tried moving this outside the try? I suspect you'll find it is throwing an exception (and thus not acquiring the lock). –  Dark Falcon Jun 14 '13 at 14:26
    
Thank Dark Falcon! But why we have to move Monitor::Enter outside the try? In the current code, It's hard to reproduce this bug, so It's hard to know this solution works or doesn't! –  TTGroup Jun 14 '13 at 15:07

2 Answers 2

The code as posted is fundamentally wrong. The Monitor::Enter() call must appear outside of the try{} block.

The failure mode is nasty and undiagnosable. If the Enter() call throw an exception for any reason then the Exit() call in the finally{} block will crash with the documented exception since the monitor was never entered. It is undiagnosable because that exception replaces the one thrown by the Enter() method, you cannot see it nor catch the original exception. So you have no idea why this code failed and cannot fix the problem.

Move the Enter call above the try block. That still doesn't fix the problem that your code crashes but at least you'll now have some decent info about what is really going wrong.

Btw, do note the added Monitor::Enter() overload available in .NET 4.0, designed to solve this kind of problem. It takes an extra bool% argument that will be set to true when Enter() succeeded so you know it is safe to call Exit().

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Thank You! I will move the Enter() outside try block, but as you said, the app still crash when this problem happen. How can I avoid the crash? –  TTGroup Jun 14 '13 at 15:25
    
I don't know until you know what the exception tells you. Surely that's obvious? –  Hans Passant Jun 14 '13 at 15:31

@Hans is partially correct. Use the Monitor.Enter overload that takes a ref bool. This overload always sets the value of the variable that is passed to the ref parameter lockTaken, even if the method throws an exception, so the value of the variable is a reliable way to test whether the lock has to be released. But DO keep the Monitor.Enter call inside the try block. Your code should resemble

bool acquiredLock = false;

try
{
    Monitor.Enter(lockObject, ref acquiredLock);

    // Code that accesses resources that are protected by the lock.

}
finally
{
    if (acquiredLock)
    {
        Monitor.Exit(lockObject);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank Steven Licht! It look ok to solve my problem, I will try it later and tell you the result. –  TTGroup Jun 14 '13 at 15:42
    
Any luck @TTGroup? –  user3454439 Oct 24 '14 at 6:42

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