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Given a data structure like the following:

set.seed(10)
fruits <- c("apple", "orange", "pineapple")
fruits2 <- data.frame(id = 1:10, fruit1 = sample(fruits, 10, replace = T), fruit2 =   sample(fruits, 10, replace = T), fruit3 = sample(fruits, 10, replace = T))

> fruits2
   id    fruit1    fruit2    fruit3
1   1    orange    orange pineapple
2   2     apple    orange    orange
3   3    orange     apple pineapple
4   4 pineapple    orange    orange
5   5     apple    orange    orange
6   6     apple    orange pineapple
7   7     apple     apple pineapple
8   8     apple     apple     apple
9   9    orange    orange pineapple
10 10    orange pineapple    orange

I can easily test whether any location in the data.frame is exactly equal to a given string with fruits2 == "mystring" and it will return a very convenient format . For example:

fruits2 == "orange"
         id fruit1 fruit2 fruit3
 [1,] FALSE   TRUE   TRUE  FALSE
 [2,] FALSE  FALSE   TRUE   TRUE
 [3,] FALSE   TRUE  FALSE  FALSE
 [4,] FALSE  FALSE   TRUE   TRUE
 [5,] FALSE  FALSE   TRUE   TRUE
 [6,] FALSE  FALSE   TRUE  FALSE
 [7,] FALSE  FALSE  FALSE  FALSE
 [8,] FALSE  FALSE  FALSE  FALSE
 [9,] FALSE   TRUE   TRUE  FALSE
[10,] FALSE   TRUE  FALSE   TRUE

However, what I would really like to do is search for a pattern (e.g. "apple") and have the same format returned. That is, I would like to be able to test whether every item in the data.frame contains (but is not necessarily equal to) the string "apple" and have the same matrix of logicals returned. In this case, I would like it to produce:

         id fruit1 fruit2 fruit3
 [1,] FALSE  FALSE  FALSE   TRUE
 [2,] FALSE   TRUE  FALSE  FALSE
 [3,] FALSE  FALSE   TRUE   TRUE
 [4,] FALSE   TRUE  FALSE  FALSE
 [5,] FALSE   TRUE  FALSE  FALSE
 [6,] FALSE   TRUE  FALSE   TRUE
 [7,] FALSE   TRUE   TRUE   TRUE
 [8,] FALSE   TRUE   TRUE   TRUE
 [9,] FALSE  FALSE  FALSE   TRUE
[10,] FALSE  FALSE   TRUE  FALSE

Is there any easy way to do this in R without specifying multiple patterns (I know in this case fruits2 == "apple" | fruits2 == "pineapple"would do it, but in my real dataset enumerating all possible strings to exactly match is not possible)?

I figure there are workarounds and I could write a function to do it using grepl() but I am wondering if there is a simpler solution.

share|improve this question
    
My apologies for the code mistakes. Line 2 should read fruits <- c("apple", "orange", "pineapple") and line 3 is missing a close parentheses at the end of the call to data.frame(). – user1231088 Jun 14 '13 at 15:01

In base R,

> apply(fruits2,2,function(x){grepl("apple",x)})
         id fruit1 fruit2 fruit3
 [1,] FALSE  FALSE  FALSE   TRUE
 [2,] FALSE   TRUE  FALSE  FALSE
 [3,] FALSE  FALSE   TRUE   TRUE
 [4,] FALSE   TRUE  FALSE  FALSE
 [5,] FALSE   TRUE  FALSE  FALSE
 [6,] FALSE   TRUE  FALSE   TRUE
 [7,] FALSE   TRUE   TRUE   TRUE
 [8,] FALSE   TRUE   TRUE   TRUE
 [9,] FALSE  FALSE  FALSE   TRUE
[10,] FALSE  FALSE   TRUE  FALSE

 n = 10000
 fruits2 <- data.frame(id = 1:n, fruit1 = sample(fruits, n, replace = T), fruit2 =   sample(fruits, n, replace = T), fruit3 = sample(fruits, n, replace = T))

> system.time(apply(fruits2,2,function(x){grepl("apple",x)}))   
  user  system elapsed 
  0.016   0.000   0.019 

> system.time(colwise(myfun)(fruits2))
  user  system elapsed 
  0.016   0.000   0.017

> system.time(sapply(fruits2,function(x) grepl('apple',x)))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.032   0.000   0.034

As @eddi points out, lapply is indeed the fastest:

> system.time(do.call("cbind",lapply(colnames(fruits2),function(x) grepl('apple',fruits2[,x]))))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.016   0.000   0.016
share|improve this answer
2  
I assume the colwise solution showed up as faster due to caching. if you look at its code, it just calls lapply after some checks. – Justin Jun 14 '13 at 15:12
1  
@Justin nah, lapply is just faster than apply here – eddi Jun 14 '13 at 16:26

Dunno if you count this as simpler, but you can use colwise from the plyr package:

myfun <- function(x) grepl('apple', x)

colwise(myfun)(fruits2)

      id fruit1 fruit2 fruit3
1  FALSE  FALSE  FALSE   TRUE
2  FALSE   TRUE  FALSE  FALSE
3  FALSE  FALSE   TRUE   TRUE
4  FALSE   TRUE  FALSE  FALSE
5  FALSE   TRUE  FALSE  FALSE
6  FALSE   TRUE  FALSE   TRUE
7  FALSE   TRUE   TRUE   TRUE
8  FALSE   TRUE   TRUE   TRUE
9  FALSE  FALSE  FALSE   TRUE
10 FALSE  FALSE   TRUE  FALSE
share|improve this answer
    
Seems very general as a strategy, since using a character vector argument (as I imagined the OP was requesting) would also be possible if it were paste-ed with collapse="|". – 42- Jun 14 '13 at 15:06
1  
sapply(fruits2,function(x) grepl('apple',x)) is also roughly equivalent, I think. – joran Jun 14 '13 at 15:07
    
I can't remember the example, but I coulda sworn I ran into instances where my data type would change using the apply family and was maintained using colwise... – Justin Jun 14 '13 at 15:09

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