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This one is very tricky...

Products table -> products have multiple colors..

I want a a stored procedure that brings back products WITH certain colors..

For example, a Santa Hat would have "Green" and "Red".. I want all products with "Green" and "Red".. not just "Green" or "Red" but BOTH..

This is what I have so far...

PROBLEMS

  1. It brings back products that have either or color and not both..
  2. Duplicate records..

Code:

DECLARE @COLORS VARCHAR(MAX) = 'Red, Green'

SELECT * 
FROM Products p
LEFT JOIN Product_Colors_Bridge b ON b.ProductID = p.ProductID
LEFT JOIN Product_Colors c on c.ID = b.ColorID
CROSS JOIN dbo.SplitString(@COLORS, ',', NULL)
WHERE CHARINDEX(token, Color) <> 0

Picture of this...

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3 Answers 3

This is an example of a set-within-sets subquery. I like to solve these using aggregation. Here the code gets a little bit trickier, because you are listing the colors in a string.

select pcp.ProductId, p.ProductName
from Product p join
     Product_Colors_Bridge pcb
     on p.id = pcb.ProductId join
     Product_Colors pc
     on pcb.ColorId = pc.Id
group by pcp.ProductId, p.ProductName
having count(distinct (case when charindex(pc.Color, @Colors) > 1 then pc.Color end)) =
       (1 + len(@Colors) - len(replace(@Colors, ',', '')))

The key is the having clause. The first part counts the number of colors that a product has that are in the list. The second counts the total number of colors, by taking the difference in length of the string with an without commas.

If you like, you could also move the case condition before the group by -- assuming that you don't care about other colors.

select pcp.ProductId, p.ProductName
from Product p join
     Product_Colors_Bridge pcb
     on p.id = pcb.ProductId join
     Product_Colors pc
     on pcb.ColorId = pc.Id join
     dbo.SplitString(@COLORS, ',', NULL) ssc
     on ssc.token = pc.Color
group by pcp.ProductId, p.ProductName
having count(*) =
       (1 + len(@Colors) - len(replace(@Colors, ',', '')))
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Assuming you are using SQL-Server 2008 or later, I would advise to steer clear of using delimited strings in SQL. If you want to pass multiple values as a parameter use Table-valued parameters.

So you would start by making your type to store multiple colours (given a generic name so it can be re-used):

CREATE TYPE dbo.StringList AS TABLE (Value NVARCHAR(MAX));

This should not be much more effort to create the parameters, but avoids costly (procedural) split methods, your query then becomes:

DECLARE @Colors dbo.StringList;
INSERT @Colors VALUES ('Red'), ('Green');

SELECT  p.ProductID, p.ProductName
FROM    Products p
        INNER JOIN Product_Colors_Bridge b 
            ON b.ProductID = p.ProductID
        INNER JOIN Product_Colors c 
            ON c.ID = b.ColorID
        INNER JOIN @colors co
            ON co.Value = c.Color
GROUP BY p.ProductID, p.ProductName
HAVING  COUNT(DISTINCT c.Color) = (SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT Value) FROM @Colors);

-- HAVING IS KEY HERE, STATING THAT THE COUNT OF DIFFERENT COLOURS ASSOCIATED 
-- WITH THE PRODUCT IS THE SAME AS THE NUMBER OF DIFFERENT COLOURS PASSED TO
-- THE QUERY IN THE PARAMETER
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Here's a simple way to do this using like:

declare @colors varchar(max) = 'Red,Green'; 

select p.ProductID, p.ProductName
from Products p
    join Product_Colors_Bridge b on b.ProductID = p.ProductID
    join Product_Colors c on c.ID = b.ColorID
where ',' + @colors + ',' like '%,' + c.Color + ',%'
group by p.ProductID, p.ProductName
having count(*) = len(@colors) - len(replace(@colors, ',', '')) + 1;

/*
  ProductID ProductName
----------- --------------
          2 Santa Hat
*/

This will get all products that have at least all the colors in your search string.

Note that I've removed the space in the search string, and I'm adding commas (in the query itself) to eliminate the possibility of a match on "BabyBlue" by searching for "Blue". I'm also assuming you don't have duplicate colors or color assignments in your tables or search string.

You'll have to test in your environment to see if this technique is faster than using a UDF for splitting, or passing the parameter in a different way (XML, table-valued parameters). That said, I would generally stay away from delimited strings in a database (though we're not storing them here, it's a slippery slope to nowhere good) and would rather use TVP or create the query dynamically in your application (using parameters, not dynamic SQL) if at all possible (which could take advantage of an index).

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