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I have a series of lists with 2 items each in them called box1, box2, box3, etc. and am trying to append to a master list to access later. Below is what i thought would work, but is not, i think it may be something with the string in the append method adding to i, but am not sure. This is obviously only adding the string box + i, but i need to figure out a way to loop through and add all similarly named items to this list. Can anyone help me see the best way to accomplish this goal?

box1 = [1,2]
box2 = [3,4]
boxes = []
##adding strings, need to add box items instead
for i in range(11):
    boxes.append("box" + str(i))    

want to see this:

boxes = [[1,2],[3,4]]

FYI - cannot use imported libraries for this due to the software i am limited to using.

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You shouldn’t have local variables box1 to box10 to begin with… Put it in a dictionary, or just directly into boxes. –  poke Jun 14 '13 at 16:06

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted
for i in range(11):
    box = locals().get('box' + str(i))
    if box is not None:
        boxes.append(box)

Note that it would be better in my opinion to refactor your code so that instead of defining the variables box1, box2, etc. you would create a dictionary and then do something like box_dict['box1'] = [1, 2]. This would allow you to easily lookup these lists later by the name.

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1  
At module level locals() is globals(), so it would work either way. –  mata Jun 14 '13 at 16:16
    
Oh good point, thanks! –  Andrew Clark Jun 14 '13 at 16:17
    
thanks, i think i will explore the dictionary options per this comment. thought i was keeping it simple with a list in a list. I really dont need to resuse the code a lot, but i think enough to justify a dictionary. –  wondergoat77 Jun 14 '13 at 16:24

You can use eval(), in your case it will be:

boxes = [eval('box%d' %i) for i in range(1,3)]

If you have a list with the box names you want to add to boxes, you can simply do:

boxes = [eval(boxname) for boxname in boxnames]
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This should work:

box1 = [1,2]
box2 = [3,4]
boxes = []
##adding strings, need to add box items instead
for i in range(1,3):
    boxes.append(locals()["box" + str(i)])
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This will work ... but the OP shouldn't have to do that sort of thing... –  Sylvain Leroux Jun 14 '13 at 16:07
    
@SylvainLeroux - I agree, it's bad style, but that's not really the question. –  mata Jun 14 '13 at 16:10
 boxDict={}
 boxes=[]
 for i in range(1,11):
      box = [i, i+1]
      boxDict[i] = box
      boxes.append(box)
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Your question is similar to one over here, but to save time, you can use getattr(object, name) to get a variable with a particular name out of an object.

You might have something like:

for i in range(11):
    boxes.append(getattr(self, "box"+i))
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One can use vars function to get dictionary of available variables

box1 = [1,2]
box2 = [3,4]
boxes = []
##adding strings, need to add box items instead
for i in range(11):
    key = "box%d" % i
    if key in vars():
         boxes.append(vars()[key])
boxes

also You should consider to check globals()

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This is rather a poor way to code, but you can do it like this

import itertools

boxes=[]
for i in itertools.count(1):
    name='box{}'.format(i)
    if name not in locals():
       break
    boxes.append(locals()[name])

For the no-libraries version:

boxes=[]
i=1
while True:
    name='box{}'.format(i)
    if name not in locals():
       break
    boxes.append(locals()[name])
    i+=1
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I think not break but continue –  oleg Jun 14 '13 at 16:07
    
should be break, since there is a not in in there –  simonzack Jun 14 '13 at 16:09
    
i cannot use imported libraries with what i am limited to right now, thank you for the answer however, i will edit my post to include this info. –  wondergoat77 Jun 14 '13 at 16:11
    
what if box3 is absent and box7 is present –  oleg Jun 14 '13 at 16:11
    
op doesn't have that in the example, but in that case a loop over all locals is needed, which is even more expensive –  simonzack Jun 14 '13 at 16:12

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