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I have a list of site URLs,

  • /node1
  • /node1/sub-node1
  • /node2
  • /node2/sub-node1

The list is given to me in a random order, I need to order it so the the top level is first, followed by sub-levels and so on (because I cannot create /node2/sub-node1 without /node2 existing). Is there a clean way to do this?

Right now I'm just making a recursive call, saying if I can't create sub-node1 because node2 exists, create node2. I'd like to have the order of the list determine the creation and get rid of my recursive call.

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2  
It'd kind of help of you put down what you already tried. –  It'sNotALie. Jun 14 '13 at 16:05
    
What if you reverse each string first before you sort them? –  ThinkingMedia Jun 14 '13 at 16:07
    
What do you mean by create node2? Perhaps there is an implementation that won't even need root levels on your list... –  BrunoLM Jun 14 '13 at 18:21

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

My first thought was ordering by length of the string... but then I thought of a list like this, that might include something like aliases for short names:

/longsitename/  
/a  
/a/b/c/  
/a  
/a/b/  
/otherlongsitename/  

... and I thought a better option was to order by the number of level-separator characters first:

IEnumerable<string> SortURLs(IEnumerable<string> urls)
{
    return urls.OrderBy(s => s.Count(c => c == '/')).ThenBy(s => s);
}

Then I thought about it some more and I saw this line in your question:

I cannot create /node2/sub-node1 without /node2 existing

Aha! The order of sections or within a section does not really matter, as long as children are always listed after parents. With that in mind, my original thought was okay and ordering by length of the string alone should be just fine:

IEnumerable<string> SortURLs(IEnumerable<string> urls)
{
    return urls.OrderBy(s => s.Length);
}

Which lead me at last to wondering why I cared about the length at all? If I just sort the strings, regardless of length, strings with the same beginning will always sort the shorter string first. Thus, at last:

IEnumerable<string> SortURLs(IEnumerable<string> urls)
{
    return urls.OrderBy(s => s);
}

I'll leave the first sample up because it may be useful if, at some point in the future, you need a more lexical or logical sort order.

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That won't work... "/" isn't a char... –  It'sNotALie. Jun 14 '13 at 16:14
    
@newStackExchangeInstance Oops. Fixed now. –  Joel Coehoorn Jun 14 '13 at 16:22
    
+1 same idea, but you produced essentially the exact same code sample first. –  jerry Jun 14 '13 at 16:37
    
Just noticed your comment about aliases. Interesting idea, but I believe any sort could break down under arbitrary aliasing. The only way around it would be the identify and replace the aliases. –  jerry Jun 14 '13 at 16:51

Is there a clean way to do this?

Just sorting the list of URI's using a standard string sort should get you what you need. In general, "a" will order before "aa" in a string sort, so "/node1" should end up before "/node1/sub-node".

For example:

List<string> test = new List<string> { "/node1/sub-node1", "/node2/sub-node1", "/node1",  "/node2"  };

foreach(var uri in test.OrderBy(s => s))
   Console.WriteLine(uri);

This will print:

/node1
/node1/sub-node1
/node2
/node2/sub-node1
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Right, what if there's a /node10? –  It'sNotALie. Jun 14 '13 at 16:12
1  
@newStackExchangeInstance Would be fine, since he only cares about the case of /node10 coming before /node10/somethingelse, since it's for folder construction. –  Reed Copsey Jun 14 '13 at 16:15
    
It would still have an illogical ordering. –  It'sNotALie. Jun 14 '13 at 16:16
1  
The issue the OP is trying to solve is making sure /node10 happens before /node10/sub-node1 from the comments he has made it does not matter if /node10 comes before /node1 as long as the items within a single directory hierarchy are logically ordered that is all that matters. the order of root items is irrelevant. –  Scott Chamberlain Jun 14 '13 at 16:16
    
That seems fine then. –  It'sNotALie. Jun 14 '13 at 16:18

Perhaps this works for you:

var nodes = new[] { "/node1", "/node1/sub-node1", "/node2", "/node2/sub-node1" };
var orderedNodes = nodes
    .Select(n => new { Levels = Path.GetFullPath(n).Split('\\').Length, Node = n })
    .OrderBy(p => p.Levels).ThenBy(p => p.Node);

Result:

foreach(var nodeInfo in orderedNodes)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Path:{0} Depth:{1}", nodeInfo.Node, nodeInfo.Levels);
}

Path:/node1 Depth:2
Path:/node2 Depth:2
Path:/node1/sub-node1 Depth:3
Path:/node2/sub-node1 Depth:3
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That's not what he's looking for... he needs all the subnodes of a node before the next node. Also his separator char is / not '\\'. –  It'sNotALie. Jun 14 '13 at 16:17
    
@newStackExchangeInstance He does not need all the subnodes of one node before the next node. All needs is for subnodes to be listed after their parents. Aside from that one rule things can be all jumbled. –  Joel Coehoorn Jun 14 '13 at 16:23
    
I still wouldn't use this, though. .Split() is slow. –  Joel Coehoorn Jun 14 '13 at 16:24
    
Oh, and add the RemoveEmptyEntries string split option. –  Joel Coehoorn Jun 14 '13 at 16:25
var values = new string[]{"/node1", "/node1/sub-node1" ,"/node2", "/node2/sub-node1"};
foreach(var val in values.OrderBy(e => e))
{
    Console.WriteLine(val);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Someone's already posted this. –  It'sNotALie. Jun 14 '13 at 16:15
    
Looks like I was typing at the same time as someone else. –  Casey Jun 20 '13 at 19:06

The best is to use natural sorting since your strings are mixed between strings and numbers. Because if you use other sorting methods or techniques and you have like this example:

List<string> test = new List<string> { "/node1/sub-node1" ,"/node13","/node10","/node2/sub-node1", "/node1", "/node2" };

the output will be:

/node1
/node1/sub-node1
/node10
/node13
/node2
/node2/sub-node1

which is not sorted.

You can look at this Implementation

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If you mean you need all the first level nodes before all the second level nodes, sort by the number of slashes /:

string[] array = {"/node1","/node1/sub-node1", "/node2", "/node2/sub-node1"};

array = array.OrderBy(s => s.Count(c => c == '/')).ToArray();

foreach(string s in array)
    System.Console.WriteLine(s);

Result:

/node1
/node2
/node1/sub-node1
/node2/sub-node1

If you just need parent nodes before child nodes, it doesn't get much simpler than

Array.Sort(array);

Result:

/node1
/node1/sub-node1
/node2
/node2/sub-node1
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Interesting idea... –  It'sNotALie. Jun 14 '13 at 16:13

Recursion is actually exactly what you should use, since this is most easily represented by a tree structure.

public class PathNode {
    public readonly string Name;
    private readonly IDictionary<string, PathNode> _children;

    public PathNode(string name) {
        Name = name;
        _children = new Dictionary<string, PathNode>(StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);
    }

    public PathNode AddChild(string name) {
        PathNode child;

        if (_children.TryGetValue(name, out child)) {
            return child;
        }

        child = new PathNode(name);

        _children.Add(name, child);

        return child;
    }

    public void Traverse(Action<PathNode> action) {
        action(this);

        foreach (var pathNode in _children.OrderBy(kvp => kvp.Key)) {
            pathNode.Value.Traverse(action);
        }
    }
}

Which you can then use like this:

var root = new PathNode(String.Empty);

var links = new[] { "/node1/sub-node1", "/node1", "/node2/sub-node-2", "/node2", "/node2/sub-node-1" };

foreach (var link in links) {
    if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(link)) {
        continue;
    }

    var node = root;

    var lastIndex = link.IndexOf("/", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);

    if (lastIndex < 0) {
        node.AddChild(link);
        continue;
    }

    while (lastIndex >= 0) {
        lastIndex = link.IndexOf("/", lastIndex + 1, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);

        node = node.AddChild(lastIndex > 0 
            ? link.Substring(0, lastIndex) // Still inside the link 
            : link // No more slashies
        );
    }
}

var orderedLinks = new List<string>();

root.Traverse(pn => orderedLinks.Add(pn.Name));

foreach (var orderedLink in orderedLinks.Where(l => !String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(l))) {
    Console.Out.WriteLine(orderedLink);
}

Which should print:

/node1
/node1/sub-node1
/node2
/node2/sub-node-1
/node2/sub-node-2
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