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I am looking for a query to for each row to find the column (YYY.) with the highest/most recent date and would like to find the corresponding column (XXXX.) Finding the column with the most recent date was possible, but getting the corresponding column left me clueless... All suggestions are welcome!!

So from the table:

| id        |       XXXX0|      YYY0 |       XXXX1|      YYY1|      XXXX9|        YYY9|
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|         A |          3 | 10-10-2009|          4 |10-10-2010|         1 |  10-10-2011| 
|         B |          2 | 10-10-2010|          3 |10-10-2012|         6 |  10-10-2011| 
|         C |          4 | 10-10-2011|          1 |10-10-2010|         7 |  10-10-2012| 
|         D |          1 | 10-10-2010|          8 |10-10-2013|         9 |  10-10-2012| 

I would like to end up with:

| id        |      LabelX|     LabelY|
--------------------------------------
|         A |          1 | 10-10-2011|
|         B |          3 | 10-10-2012|
|         C |          7 | 10-10-2012|
|         D |          8 | 10-10-2013|

Added: This was what I tried to determine the maximum value:

SELECT LTRIM(A) AS A, LTRIM(B) AS B, LTRIM(C) 
    (Select Max(v)
    FROM (VALUES (YYY0), (YYY1), …..(YYY9) AS value(v)) as [MaxDate]
FROM Table
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1  
Can we see what you have tried? –  Bob. Jun 14 '13 at 17:22
    
What is your RDBMS? –  Michał Powaga Jun 14 '13 at 18:02
    
Are dates unique in each column for specific id? –  Michał Powaga Jun 14 '13 at 18:16
    
I have to double check the RDBMS, it is an incompany database, but unfortunatly also no internet there, so playing with SQL Fiddle now... –  Martijn Zuiderbaan Jun 14 '13 at 20:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
SELECT id,
CASE
WHEN YYYY0 > YYY1 AND YYY0 > YYY2 ... AND YYY0 > YYY9 THEN XXX0
WHEN YYY1 > YYY2 ... AND YYY0 > YYY9 THEN XXX1
...
ELSE XXX9 AS LabelX,
CASE
WHEN YYYY0 > YYY1 AND YYY0 > YYY2 ... AND YYY0 > YYY9 THEN YYY0
WHEN YYY1 > YYY2 ... AND YYY0 > YYY9 THEN YYY1
...
ELSE YYY9 AS LabelY,
...

and replace > by >= depending on which you want to win if they're equal.

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If it's a SQL Server 2005 and above you can do it this way (it assumes that dates are unique in each column for specific id):

;with cte as (
    select id, xxxx0 as LabelX, yyy0 as LabelY from tab union all
    select id, xxxx1, yyy1 from tab union all
    select id, xxxx9, yyy9 from tab
)
select t.id, x.LabelX, t.LabelY from (
    select t1.id,  max(t1.LabelY) as LabelY 
    from cte t1
    group by t1.id
) t
join cte x on t.id = x.id and t.LabelY = x.LabelY

Live SQL Fiddle example

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But unfortunatly it does contain some non-unique dates (1-1-1900 for the fields that haven't been used yet) –  Martijn Zuiderbaan Jun 14 '13 at 19:52

Here's a simplified example for you. I'm using SQL Server 2008, but this SQL is pretty standard and should work fine on most modern implementations (famous last words).

So, given this table schema:

drop table dbo.foobar
go
create table dbo.foobar
(
  id    char(1) not null primary key ,
  X1 int not null , Y1 date not null ,
  X2 int not null , Y2 date not null ,
  X3 int not null , Y3 date not null ,
)
go

And some sample data:

insert dbo.foobar values ( 'A' , 1 , '1 Jan 2013' , 2 , '1 Feb 2013' , 3 , '1 Mar 2013' )
insert dbo.foobar values ( 'B' , 1 , '1 Mar 2013' , 2 , '1 Jan 2013' , 3 , '1 Feb 2013' )
insert dbo.foobar values ( 'C' , 1 , '1 Feb 2013' , 2 , '1 Mar 2013' , 3 , '1 Jan 2013' )
go

Depending on the nature of your data and the desired semantics of the query and results, either this approach:

--
-- This approach pushes evaluation of the corresponding X to the output column list
--
-- 1. Construct a UNION ALL to normalize the table into a set of id/date pairs
-- 2. Compute max(date) for each id
-- 3. Join back against the original table to recover the source row
-- 4. Use the max(date) value to identify the corresponding X 
--
select t.id ,
       MaxY = t.y ,
       X    = case
              when t.Y = x.Y1 then x.X1
              when t.Y = x.Y2 then x.X2
              when t.Y = x.Y3 then x.X3
              end
from ( select x.id ,
              y = max( x.y )
       from (           select id , y=y1 from dbo.foobar
              union all select id , y=y2 from dbo.foobar
              union all select id , y=y3 from dbo.foobar
            ) x
        group by x.id
      ) t
join dbo.foobar x on x.id = t.id
order by 1,2,3
go

Or this approach

--
-- This approach looks at each X/Y pair as its own "table" as it were
--
select t.id       ,
       MaxY = t.y ,
       X    = coalesce( t1.X1 , t2.X2 , t3.X3 )
from ( select x.id ,
              y = max( x.y )
       from (           select id , y=Y1 from dbo.foobar
              union all select id , y=Y2 from dbo.foobar
              union all select id , y=Y3 from dbo.foobar
            ) x
        group by x.id
     ) t
left join dbo.foobar t1 on t1.id = t.id and t1.y1 = t.Y
left join dbo.foobar t2 on t2.id = t.id and t2.y2 = t.Y
left join dbo.foobar t3 on t3.id = t.id and t3.y3 = t.Y
order by 1,2,3

should work for you. In either event, both queries produce an identical result set:

id MaxY       X
-- ---------- -
A  2013-03-01 3
B  2013-03-01 1
C  2013-03-01 2

Good Luck!

[Have you considered normalizing your database design? Third Normal Form makes life a lot easier and usually more efficient.]

share|improve this answer
    
Modifying the database isn't an option unfortunatly, it contains millions of records of several years and not managed by me ;) –  Martijn Zuiderbaan Jun 14 '13 at 20:16
    
Unfortunatly my SQL knowledge isn't what I would like it to be... I tried your code on SQL Fiddle, but can't seem to get it to work. Can you give some pointers? sqlfiddle.com/#!3/643b9/15 –  Martijn Zuiderbaan Jun 14 '13 at 21:17
    
@MartijnZuiderbaan. See my modified answer. Outside of the date data type and the go statement delimiter that SQL Server likes, the amended sql should work on most realatively modern SQL implementations. –  Nicholas Carey Jun 14 '13 at 22:27

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