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I'm building a To Do List web app that walks someone through a specific time management technique. I built this app entirely with JavaScript and jQuery since I do not yet know a server language. Am I correct in assuming that anyone who accesses the website would be able to see all of the JavaScript file for that site? Should I worry that someone could easily copy and use the codebase because of this?

Do most web applications perform most computations (even if they don't involve the use of a database) on the server-side (with a server programming language) instead of the client-side (with JS)? Do they do this so that people can not view the code base or is there some other reason? (Or is this not a standard practice?)

I'm not at all aware of what the standard practices or rules of the road are for web app development so any input is appreciated.

Apologies for any terminology that is used incorrectly.

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2 Answers 2

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anyone who accesses the website would be able to see all of the JavaScript file for that site?

Yes. Obfuscation does not even help.

Should I worry that someone could easily copy and use the codebase because of this?

Depends on what you have.

Usually secure stuff should stay at the server, like validations, or full access to the database. Client-side should have limited access. Usually, what you have on the client-side is purely for presentation and UX.

Do most web applications perform most computations (even if they don't involve the use of a database) on the server-side (with a server programming language) instead of the client-side (with JS)?

Depends on the task.

Sometimes developers just place logic on the server because it's just faster there. Think of Google Directions and how it calculates routes through an infinite possibilities. You wouldn't want the local machine to do that for you

But some apps are designed as "offline first" where they can run even without internet connection. Think of Gmail, where it continues to run (to some point) even if you pull the plug on your internet connection. It even tells you you have no connection and waits until you gain back the connection in order to send a pending mail.

Do they do this so that people can not view the code base or is there some other reason? (Or is this not a standard practice?)

Sometimes yes, like validation and authentication. You wouldn't want the people to know how you did it or what goes on when you encrypt something or what salt was used to hash your password.

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Javascript is still evolving. Javascript engines eg. V8 made by Chrome are not comparable to javascript engines known from IE6/7 browsers. Of course js, css, html code is viewable to user and what you can do is to minify and obfuscate that code, but still it's easy to unminify. Very popular trend right now is to build Single Page Applications (SPA) that move most application logic to client and communication with server is done asynchronously with AJAX calls to RESTful API.

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Jimmy,Thanks. I was wondering whether minifying was a way of making the code faster to run for the browser or something. I've certainly had trouble myself trying to understand JavaScript I viewed on public websites to learn how they run. I was wondering if they were just written very badly but I understand from you that they may be purposefully obfuscated. So did I waste my time writing 1,000 lines of JavaScript? I'm also working on an app to play Blackjack and compares various card counting strategies with their accuracy (app. 1,500 lines of code so far). –  Jackmc1047 Jun 14 '13 at 19:00
    
any line of code ever written is not a waste of time :) –  jimmyweb Jun 14 '13 at 23:09

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