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$('#form1').submit(function () {
    var filal = $('input#l_email').val().length && $('input#l_pswd').val().length;
    if (!(filal)) {
        $("div#login_feed").fadeIn(400);
        return false;
    } else {
        alert('hello')
        $.post('create_login.php', {
            lemail: $('input#email').val(),
            lpswd: $('input#pswd').val()
        }, function (result) {
            if (result == 'sucess') return true;
            else return false;
        });
    }
});

I am unable to find where the bug is. If it enters into if block, it won't submit the form but I do not know what's going wrong. When it enters else block, it alerts hello and automatically submits the form without waiting for the completion of AJAX request. I know the code is creepy with too may return statements but I am new to jQuery style so kindly let me know the way to do it.

share|improve this question
    
The return true and false inside the ajax happens LONG after the submit handler has returned undefined, thus causing the form to submit normally. – Kevin B Jun 14 '13 at 20:08
    
You have a typo in your code - your var is filall, with three ls, but your condition tests filal. – Chris Heald Jun 14 '13 at 20:09
    
so how do i stop the form submitting and submit it only after AJAX request ? @KevinB – niko Jun 14 '13 at 20:13
1  
you stop it immediately then trigger the submit when you want it to submit. – Kevin B Jun 14 '13 at 20:15
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot return out of an asynchronous callback, here's why:

var x = setTimeout(function(){
    return "foobar";
},1000)
alert(x); // the id of the settimeout instead of "foobar"

The same thing happens with your ajax request.

var foo = (function(){
    $.post("foo.php",function(){
        return "foobar";
    })
})();
alert(foo); // undefined because your function didn't return anything!!

In your case, you need to stop the default action completely then submit the form after the ajax request.

$('#form1').submit(function (e) {
    e.preventDefault(); // stop default action
    var theform = this;
    var filal = $('input#l_email').val().length && $('input#l_pswd').val().length;
    if (!(filal)) {
        $("div#login_feed").fadeIn(400);
        return false;
    } else {
        alert('hello')
        $.post('create_login.php', {
            lemail: $('input#email').val(),
            lpswd: $('input#pswd').val()
        }, function (result) {
            if (result == 'sucess') theform.submit(); // submit form, bypassing jQuery bound submit handler to prevent infinite loop
        });
    }
});

Please fix your typos. Misspelled words will hurt later.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks and using this $('#form').trigger('submit') instead of $('#form').submit() makes any difference? Just want to know – niko Jun 14 '13 at 20:24
1  
no, it does not, but this is not you want. The gem in the code here is the difference between theform and $("#form1") - the former being DOM element and the latter - jquery wrapper. theform.submit() will not trigger jquery event again recursively. – Igor Jun 14 '13 at 20:25
    
Yes, it makes a HUGE difference. using $("#form").trigger("submit") will trigger the jQuery-bound event, causing an infinite loop. $("#form")[0].submit() on the other hand does not trigger the jQuery-bound event, thus avoiding the infinite loop. $("#form")[0] gives you a Form Element rather than a jQuery object containing a form element, thus you are using the form element's submit method rather than the jQuery object's submit method. – Kevin B Jun 14 '13 at 20:27
    
its not submitting it enters the if block result=="sucess" but theform.submit does not seem to work . – niko Jun 14 '13 at 20:32
    
rename your submit button from "submit" to something else. – Kevin B Jun 14 '13 at 20:43

The submit action send the form by default, you need to stop that with preventDefault();

$('#form1').submit(function (event) {
  event.preventDefault();
share|improve this answer
$('#form1').submit(function (event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    var filal = $('#l_email').val().length && $('#l_pswd').val().length;
    if (!(filal)) {
        $("div#login_feed").fadeIn(400);
    } else {
        $.post('create_login.php', {
            lemail: $('#email').val(),
            lpswd: $('#pswd').val()
        }, function (result) {
            if (result == 'sucess')
                $('#form1').get().submit();

        });
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
I left it as is, but you misspelled success. – Robert McKee Jun 14 '13 at 20:19
    
this will recursively trigger the jquery bound submit event, you need to instead trigger it on the formNode, see my answer. – Kevin B Jun 14 '13 at 20:22
    
Not sure if you really wanted to do another submit. You've already created the login, why not just window.location to somewhere afterwards? – Robert McKee Jun 14 '13 at 20:22
    
@KevinB You are correct, I've updated the answer. – Robert McKee Jun 14 '13 at 20:29

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