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I'm working with a large csv file and the next to last column has a string of text that I want to split by a specific delimiter. I was wondering if there is a simple way to do this using pandas or python?

CustNum  CustomerName     ItemQty  Item   Seatblocks                 ItemExt
32363    McCartney, Paul      3     F04    2:218:10:4,6                   60
31316    Lennon, John        25     F01    1:13:36:1,12 1:13:37:1,13     300

I want to split by the space(' ') and then the colon(':') in the 'Seatblocks' column, but each cell would result in a different number of columns. I have a function to rearrange the columns so the Seatblocks column is at the end of the sheet, but I'm not sure what to do from there. I can do it in excel with the built in 'text-to-columns' function and a quick macro, but my dataset has too many records for excel to handle.

Ultimately, I want to take records such John Lennon's and create multiple lines, with the info from each set of seats on a separate line.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 29 down vote accepted
+50

This splits the Seatblocks by space and gives each its own row.

In [43]: df
Out[43]: 
   CustNum     CustomerName  ItemQty Item                 Seatblocks  ItemExt
0    32363  McCartney, Paul        3  F04               2:218:10:4,6       60
1    31316     Lennon, John       25  F01  1:13:36:1,12 1:13:37:1,13      300

In [44]: s = df['Seatblocks'].str.split(' ').apply(Series, 1).stack()

In [45]: s.index = s.index.droplevel(-1) # to line up with df's index

In [46]: s.name = 'Seatblocks' # needs a name to join

In [47]: s
Out[47]: 
0    2:218:10:4,6
1    1:13:36:1,12
1    1:13:37:1,13
Name: Seatblocks, dtype: object

In [48]: del df['Seatblocks']

In [49]: df.join(s)
Out[49]: 
   CustNum     CustomerName  ItemQty Item  ItemExt    Seatblocks
0    32363  McCartney, Paul        3  F04       60  2:218:10:4,6
1    31316     Lennon, John       25  F01      300  1:13:36:1,12
1    31316     Lennon, John       25  F01      300  1:13:37:1,13

Or, to give each colon-separated string in its own column:

In [50]: df.join(s.apply(lambda x: Series(x.split(':'))))
Out[50]: 
   CustNum     CustomerName  ItemQty Item  ItemExt  0    1   2     3
0    32363  McCartney, Paul        3  F04       60  2  218  10   4,6
1    31316     Lennon, John       25  F01      300  1   13  36  1,12
1    31316     Lennon, John       25  F01      300  1   13  37  1,13

This is a little ugly, but maybe someone will chime in with a prettier solution.

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2  
@DanAllan give an index to the Series when you apply; they will become column names –  Jeff Jun 14 '13 at 21:48
    
Slightly more generic solution is to use droplevel(-1) as this'll work with MultiIndexes. –  Andy Hayden Sep 3 '13 at 16:20
    
Good suggestion. And thanks for the possible retroactive bounty! –  Dan Allan Sep 3 '13 at 17:26

Differently from Dan, I consider his answer quite elegant... but unfortunately it is also very very inefficient. So, since the question mentioned "a large csv file", let me suggest to try in a shell Dan's solution:

time python -c "import pandas as pd;
df = pd.DataFrame(['a b c']*100000, columns=['col']);
print df['col'].apply(lambda x : pd.Series(x.split(' '))).head()"

... compared to this alternative:

time python -c "import pandas as pd;
from scipy import array, concatenate;
df = pd.DataFrame(['a b c']*100000, columns=['col']);
print pd.DataFrame(concatenate(df['col'].apply( lambda x : [x.split(' ')]))).head()"

... and this:

time python -c "import pandas as pd;
df = pd.DataFrame(['a b c']*100000, columns=['col']);
print pd.DataFrame(dict(zip(range(3), [df['col'].apply(lambda x : x.split(' ')[i]) for i in range(3)]))).head()"

The second simply refrains from allocating 100 000 Series, and this is enough to make it around 10 times faster. But the third solution, which somewhat ironically wastes a lot of calls to str.split() (it is called once per column per row, so three times more than for the others two solutions), is around 40 times faster than the first, because it even avoids to instance the 100 000 lists. And yes, it is certainly a little ugly...

EDIT: this answer suggests how to use "to_list()" and to avoid the need for a lambda. The result is something like

time python -c "import pandas as pd;
df = pd.DataFrame(['a b c']*100000, columns=['col']);
print pd.DataFrame(df.col.str.split().tolist()).head()"

which is even more efficient than the third solution, and certainly much more elegant.

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I'm having a little trouble with the amount of memory that this method consumes and I'm wondering if you could give me a little advice. I have a DataFrame that contains about 8000 rows, each with a string containing 9216 space delimited 8-bit integers. This is roughly 75MB, but when I apply the last solution verbatim, Python eats 2GB of my memory. Can you point me in the direction of some source that would tell me why this is, and what I can do to get around it? Thanks. –  castle-bravo Jul 3 at 4:59
1  
You have a lot of lists and very small strings, which is more or less the worst case for memory usage in python (and the intermediate step ".split().tolist()" produces pure python objects). What I would probably do in your place would be to dump the DataFrame to a file, and then open it as csv with read_csv(..., sep=' '). But to stay on topic: the first solution (together with the third, which however should be awfully slow) may be the one offering you the lowest memory usage among the 4, since you have a relatively small number of relatively long rows. –  Pietro Battiston Jul 3 at 12:42
    
Hey Pietro, I tried your suggestion of saving to a file and re-loading, an it worked quite well. I ran into some trouble when I tried to do this in a StringIO object, and a nice solution to my problem has been posted here. –  castle-bravo Jul 3 at 23:09
    
Your last suggestion of tolist() is perfect. In my case I only wanted one of the pieces of data in the list and was able to directly add a single column to my existing df by using .ix: df['newCol'] = pd.DataFrame(df.col.str.split().tolist()).ix[:,2] –  fantabolous Jul 21 at 8:37

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