Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Trying to insert multiple rows based on a passed parameter.

Tried this and it only repeated once:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[ActivateCertificates]

    @Count              int,
    @CertificateNumber  int,
    @Buyer              VarChar(50)


AS
Declare @x int
Declare @InitialCharacter   Char(1)
SET @InitialCharacter='C'
Declare @Last3      Char(3)
SET @Last3='867'

    while @x <= @Count 
begin
    /* CREATE THE CERTIFICATE NUMBER */
    set @CertificateNumber = @CertificateNumber +1
    /* insert into certificates  cert number and who sold to. */
    INSERT into Certificates (CertificateNumber,Buyer) 
    VALUES (@InitialCharacter + ltrim(rtrim(cast(@CertificateNumber as char))) + @Last3, @Buyer) 
end 
set @x =@x + 1


GO
share|improve this question
2  
Initialize @x to 0; increment it inside the begin..end block. –  Tim Jun 14 '13 at 22:04
1  
Don't write loops in TSQL. Write a set based query to do that instead. –  JohnFx Jun 14 '13 at 22:30
    
Thanks, Got that working, how would i return an error message if one of the inserts tried to insert a cert number that already existed as this is a unique value in the DB –  Doug Farrell Jun 14 '13 at 22:41
    
Ok, I will start using set based query, can you show me the differance?? –  Doug Farrell Jun 14 '13 at 22:48
    
Of greater concern to me than your use of loops is your CertificateNumber, which seems to be one of those legacy critters that have embedded meaning. Does that three-digit suffix have significance? And why are you trimming @CertificateNumber? It is passed an integer. When you cast it to char it shouldn't accrete any spaces. –  Tim Jun 15 '13 at 12:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To achieve your goal using a set-based query instead of a loop (BTW there are lots of such examples here on StackOverflow) you'll have to have a tally (numbers) table or create it on a fly with a subquery or recursive CTE.

CREATE TABLE tally (id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY);

To populate it up to 100000 (Celko-style)

INSERT INTO tally (id) 
SELECT a.N + b.N * 10 + c.N * 100 + d.N * 1000 + e.N * 10000 + 1 as N
  FROM (select 0 as N union all select 1 union all select 2 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) a
      , (select 0 as N union all select 1 union all select 2 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) b
      , (select 0 as N union all select 1 union all select 2 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) c
      , (select 0 as N union all select 1 union all select 2 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) d
      , (select 0 as N union all select 1 union all select 2 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) e
ORDER BY N;

Now your stored procedure boils down to one statement

CREATE PROCEDURE ActivateCertificates
  @Count              INT,
  @CertificateNumber  INT,
  @Buyer              VARCHAR(50)
AS
INSERT INTO Certificates (CertificateNumber, Buyer) 
SELECT 'C' + CAST(q.number + t.id AS VARCHAR(12)) + '867', q.buyer 
  FROM
( 
  SELECT @CertificateNumber number, @Buyer buyer
) q, tally t
WHERE t.id <= @Count;

Here is SQLFiddle demo

Now if you generate relatively small amounts of certificates (< 32768) then you can use recursive CTE to build a sequence of numbers (and don't need a persisted tally table)

CREATE PROCEDURE ActivateCertificates
  @Count              INT,
  @CertificateNumber  INT,
  @Buyer              VARCHAR(50)
AS
WITH tally AS (
  SELECT 1 id
  UNION ALL
  SELECT id + 1 FROM tally WHERE id < @Count
)
INSERT INTO Certificates (CertificateNumber, Buyer) 
SELECT 'C' + CAST(q.number + t.id AS VARCHAR(12)) + '867', q.buyer 
  FROM
( 
  SELECT @CertificateNumber number, @Buyer buyer
) q, tally t OPTION (MAXRECURSION 32767);

Here is SQLFiddle demo for that case

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent alternative but I still have on burning question.....I got it to work the way I wanted using a variation of my original idea, what are the advantages of your way? –  Doug Farrell Jun 18 '13 at 16:54
    
@DougFarrell Good for you. RDBMSes are optimized to work with sets so thats more efficient. You can take a look at some comparison (loops vs. sets) here stackoverflow.com/a/17139749/1920232. –  peterm Jun 18 '13 at 17:14
    
Thank you for the answer, it I will definitely use this method next time. –  Doug Farrell Jun 18 '13 at 19:49

Your variable is incremented outside the BEGIN/END block. Also I would recommend you initially set your variable to 0 to avoid any potential garbage data stored in that memory location.

share|improve this answer
    
Got that figured out, couldn't answer my own Q as this is my first day here. What do you think about the above comment to use a set based query instead? Can anyone show me one vs the one i wrote above? –  Doug Farrell Jun 14 '13 at 22:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.