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So I have a rake task that does this:

  wine_club_memberships = WineClubMembership.pluck(:billing_info_id)
  total_updated = BillingInfo.joins(:order).where(["orders.ordered_date < (CURRENT_DATE - 90) AND billing_infos.card_number IS NOT NULL AND billing_infos.card_number != '' AND billing_infos.id NOT IN (?)", wine_club_memberships]).update_all("card_number = ''")
  log.error("Total records updated #{total_updated}")

The thing is that BillingInfo has 300,000+ records, and I'm wondering if all this joins, where, update_all is just the same as using pure SQL. Currently it's not too efficient, since I have a huge array of WineClubMembership records that I stuff in the statement.

Is there a more efficient way of doing this? Even though this is a long ugly statement, I was thinking that it would be efficient for the most part because it does everything pretty much in one or two hits to the database. However, people around me are thinking there must be other "Rails methods" that could do this in a better way that won't affect the performance of the production website.

I did see doing searches in "batches" but I am not sure if that will help.

UPDATE

I'm using Postgres 9.1+. In the old (just a little simpler) version of my activerecord search, This is what came out:

Ruby code:

  wine_club_memberships = WineClubMembership.pluck(:billing_info_id)
  total_updated = BillingInfo.joins(:order).where(["orders.ordered_date < (CURRENT_DATE - 90) AND billing_infos.id NOT IN (?)", wine_club_memberships]).update_all("card_number = ''")

SQL generated:

  SQL (127848.6ms)  UPDATE "billing_infos" SET card_number = '' WHERE "billing_infos"."id" IN (SELECT "billing_infos"."id" FROM "billing_infos" INNER JOIN "orders" ON "orders"."id" = "billing_infos"."order_id" WHERE (orders.ordered_date < (CURRENT_DATE - 90) AND billing_infos.id NOT IN (423908,390663,387323,402393,383446,416114,391009,456371,384305,386681,384382,384418, ...)))
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Step one should be taking a look at development.log to see what SQL it produces. If that looks efficient (single update rather than some horrible N+1 thing), then you can do an EXPLAIN on the SQL to see what the database is really doing (make sure it's using indices, etc.). Performance is very dependent on the underlying DB and you haven't mentioned which DB you're using. –  Jim Stewart Jun 14 '13 at 21:41
    
I updated it with more details –  Edmund Jun 14 '13 at 21:57
    
any luck with this? –  Matthew Graves Jun 25 '13 at 16:42

1 Answer 1

It's possible that if you have your db manage the source of the final NOT IN comparison there will be optimizations in the db for dealing with it I.e. let sql manage the list of ids instead of passing it a 300,000 item long array. If your db allows try something like

... NOT IN (SELECT billing_info_id FROM wine_club_memberships)").update_all("card_number = ''")

As far as a Rails specific method for speeding this up, you're usually not going to be able to do better (performance-wise, if not maintainability-wise) than just passing a pure sql string to the dbs.

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