Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking at an algorithm I'm trying to optimize, and it's basically a lot of bit twiddling, followed by some additions in a tight feedback. If I could use carry-save addition for the adders, it would really help me speed things up, but I'm not sure if I can distribute the operations over the addition.

Specifically if I represent:

  a = sa+ca  (state + carry)
  b = sb+cb

can I represent (a >>> r) in terms of s and c? How about a | b and a & b?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Think about it...

sa = 1    ca = 1
sb = 1    cb = 1
a = sa + ca = 2
b = sb + cb = 2
(a | b) = 2
(a & b) = 2
(sa | sb) + (ca | cb) = (1 | 1) + (1 | 1) = 1 + 1 = 2 # Coincidence?
(sa & sb) + (ca & cb) = (1 & 1) + (1 & 1) = 1 + 1 = 2 # Coincidence?

Let's try some other values:

sa = 1001   ca = 1   # Binary
sb = 0100   cb = 1
a = sa + ca = 1010
b = sb + cb = 0101
(a | b) = 1111
(a & b) = 0000
(sa | sb) + (ca | cb) = (1001 | 0101) + (1 | 1) = 1101 + 1 = 1110 # Oh dear!
(sa & sb) + (ca & cb) = (1001 & 0101) + (1 & 1) = 0001 + 1 = 2    # Oh dear!

So, proof by 4-bit counter example that you cannot distribute AND or OR over addition.

What about '>>>' (unsigned or logical right shift). Using the last example values, and r = 1:

sa = 1001
ca = 0001
sa >>> 1 = 0101
ca >>> 1 = 0000
(sa >>> 1) + (ca >>> 1) = 0101 + 0000 = 0101
(sa + ca) >>> 1 = (1001 + 0001) >>> 1 = 1010 >>> 1 = 0101  # Coincidence?

Let's see whether that is coincidence too:

sa = 1011
ca = 0001
sa >>> 1 = 0101
ca >>> 1 = 0000
(sa >>> 1) + (ca >>> 1) = 0101 + 0000 = 0101
(sa + ca) >>> 1 = (1011 + 0001) >>> 1 = 1100 >>> 1 = 0110  # Oh dear!

Proof by counter-example again.

So logical right shift is not distributive over addition either.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.