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Amazon AWS Data Pipeline provides a CSV file as output from a MySQL Database. In the CSV, there's a field containing JSON, which we're attempting to extract and decode with Python's built-in CSV and JSON readers respectively. However, due to the way the CSV is generated, the JSON does not start with a quotation mark, and the CSV parser is returning only the first '{' in the JSON for that CSV field.

We think the CSV reader sees the first '{' and then sees a newline character which it interprets as the end of the CSV row. The script works fine if the JSON is wrapped in quotation marks. See the following code:

with open(args.env_vars[0] + '/click_stream_source.csv', 'r') as csvFile:
    csvReader = csv.reader(csvFile, delimiter = ',')
    with open(args.env_vars[1] + '/clickstream_target.csv', 'wb') as csvTarget:
        csvWriter = csv.writer(csvTarget, delimiter = ',')
        for row in csvReader:
            json_data = json.loads(row[5])

A sample CSV is:

    495019,,8239,E3728E7D480248AA2EB5D5BB5C467737,67.84.254.6,{
            ""requests"": [
          {
             ""queryString"": null,
             ""time"": ""2013-06-14T11:53:40Z"",
             ""userAgent"": ""Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 10.0; Windows NT 6.1; Trident/6.0)"",
             ""requestURI"": ""/xxxxx/xxxx/xxxx.xxxxxxx"",
             ""class"": ""xxxxx"",
             ""params"": {
                ""action"": ""xxxxx"",
                ""controller"": ""xxxx""
             },
             ""isAjaxRequest"": false
          }]}

We get a

ValueError: Expecting Object ...

Where json.loads() method

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Somebody flagged this as too localized. MySQL users probably deal with crappy CSV all the time, but MySQL and AWS are such a niche database and ISP... –  Paulo Scardine Jun 14 '13 at 23:57
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4 Answers

I think technically you can't call this CSV because it violates parsing rules, but I'm not trying to be pedantic, I'm trying to say that's a reason to abandon built-in parsing tools and go old-school, make a finite-state-machine. Here's a quick-and-dirty example you can adapt to your purposes.

#!/usr/bin/env python
import re
import json

def fix_and_parse(gathered_lines):
    strJson = '{' + "\n".join(gathered_lines)
    strJson = strJson.replace('""', '"')
    return json.loads(strJson)

state = 0
with open('csvFile', 'r') as csvFile:
    gathered_lines = []
    for line in csvFile:
        if re.search('^\d', line):
            if gathered_lines:
                print json.dumps(fix_and_parse(gathered_lines), indent=4)
            state = 0
            gathered_lines = []
        else:
            state = 1
        if state == 1:
            gathered_lines.append(line)
print json.dumps(fix_and_parse(gathered_lines), indent=4)
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I don't think this can be called CSV, so the CSV module will not help.

You may use a regular expression to turn [\r\n]\s+ into space. If the "JSON" is the last field, you can split by the number of columns (the transformation necessary in order to turn the last column into valid JSON is left as homework for the reader) Example:

In [1]: l = """495019,,8239,E3728E7D480248AA2EB5D5BB5C467737,67.84.254.6,{
   ...:             ""requests"": [
   ...:           {
   ...:              ""queryString"": null,
   ...:              ""time"": ""2013-06-14T11:53:40Z"",
   ...:              ""userAgent"": ""Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 10.0; Windows NT 6.1; Trident/6.0)"",
   ...:              ""requestURI"": ""/xxxxx/xxxx/xxxx.xxxxxxx"",
   ...:              ""class"": ""xxxxx"",
   ...:              ""params"": {
   ...:                 ""action"": ""xxxxx"",
   ...:                 ""controller"": ""xxxx""
   ...:              },
   ...:              ""isAjaxRequest"": false
   ...:           }]}"""

In [2]: import re

In [3]: l_ = re.sub(r'[\n\r]\s+', ' ', l)

In [4]: l_
Out[4]: '495019,,8239,E3728E7D480248AA2EB5D5BB5C467737,67.84.254.6,{ ""requests"": [ { ""queryString"": null, ""time"": ""2013-06-14T11:53:40Z"", ""userAgent"": ""Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 10.0; Windows NT 6.1; Trident/6.0)"", ""requestURI"": ""/xxxxx/xxxx/xxxx.xxxxxxx"", ""class"": ""xxxxx"", ""params"": { ""action"": ""xxxxx"", ""controller"": ""xxxx"" }, ""isAjaxRequest"": false }]}'

In [5]: l_.split(',', 5)
Out[5]:
['495019',
 '',
 '8239',
 'E3728E7D480248AA2EB5D5BB5C467737',
 '67.84.254.6',
 '{ ""requests"": [ { ""queryString"": null, ""time"": ""2013-06-14T11:53:40Z"", ""userAgent"": ""Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 10.0; Windows NT 6.1; Trident/6.0)"", ""requestURI"": ""/xxxxx/xxxx/xxxx.xxxxxxx"", ""class"": ""xxxxx"", ""params"": { ""action"": ""xxxxx"", ""controller"": ""xxxx"" }, ""isAjaxRequest"": false }]}']

Look if the line splits inside the "JSON" are different from the end of record (for example, one is \n and the other is \r\n, this could make your job easier.

This is a little hackish - a proper implementation probably should use a parser (a formal EBNF grammar for this should fall under 10 lines).

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This is along the lines of what I was thinking of - we were just hoping to avoid manual string manipulation to keep the code complexity down. No such luck on the JSON having different style line-breaks, so this could potentially be a problem if the database authors intended to store newlines as part of a particular field (they weren't before we left for the weekend). We could be more specific with our matching pattern but again, the goal for this particular project was to keep the code simple and maintainable. Thanks for all the effort on the post though! –  Jacob Schaer Jun 15 '13 at 4:35
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are some really interesting suggestions here, but after further consideration my team decided that we would go for a more direct solution. Unfortunately for future readers, this is a little bit specific to MySQL/AWS CSV's, but we decided to correct the issue in the SQL query itself:

SELECT RANDOM_FIELD, RANDOM_FIELD2, ..., REPLACE(JSON_FIELD,'\n','NEWLINE') FROM DATABASE ....

This fixes the line-break which is really the problem, not the CSV. Note, the original goal was to REPLACE \n with \\n, but again the CSV generator was removing the escape '\'. With that said, I really like Paulo Scardine's solution and it worked well for the few test cases we played with; it seems like there might be an issue if a string in the JSON actually contained a newline character (this was something which we didn't get a chance to discuss with the database authors).

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I will accept a final answer when we resume work next week, if that is allowed by the stackoverflow policies. –  Jacob Schaer Jun 15 '13 at 4:43
    
+1, kills the problem at the nest. –  Paulo Scardine Jun 15 '13 at 5:38
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You neither have valid csv nor valid json.

You may use a regular expression to turn [\r\n]\s+ into space

For what purpose?

import json

data = '''495019,,8239,E3728E7D480248AA2EB5D5BB5C467737,67.84.254.6,{
            "requests": [
          {
             "queryString": null,
             "time": "2013-06-14T11:53:40Z",
             "userAgent": "Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 10.0; Windows NT 6.1; Trident/6.0)",
             "requestURI": "/xxxxx/xxxx/xxxx.xxxxxxx",
             "class": "xxxxx",
             "params": {
                "action": "xxxxx",
                "controller": "xxxx"
             },
             "isAjaxRequest": false
          }]}'''

pieces = data.split(',', 5)
print pieces[5]

json_dict = json.loads( pieces[5] )
print json_dict['requests'][0]['time']

--output:--

{
            "requests": [
          {
             "queryString": null,
             "time": "2013-06-14T11:53:40Z",
             "userAgent": "Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 10.0; Windows NT 6.1; Trident/6.0)",
             "requestURI": "/xxxxx/xxxx/xxxx.xxxxxxx",
             "class": "xxxxx",
             "params": {
                "action": "xxxxx",
                "controller": "xxxx"
             },
             "isAjaxRequest": false
          }]}

2013-06-14T11:53:40Z
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1  
will this work if there is multiple records in the same file? –  Paulo Scardine Jun 14 '13 at 23:45
    
Ta da............ –  7stud Jun 14 '13 at 23:47
    
I agree with Paulo Scardine here - this would not work well for anything beyond the first "line" of the CSV, especially since there are a variable number of comma's in each patch of JSON (the snippet is only one example of many possibilities). –  Jacob Schaer Jun 15 '13 at 4:29
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